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Record $6m payment for disabled WA cop

AAP logoAAP 24/11/2016 Rebecca Le May

A West Australian policeman left paralysed after contracting a rare disease has been granted a $6 million compensation payment, which his father says will be enough for his son to live in comfort.

Constable Ryan Marron became ill with the mosquito-borne disease Murray Valley encephalitis while working in the remote Balgo community in the Kimberley in 2011.

The next year he was given $400,000 to seek specialist medical treatment in the US.

The family rejected a record $5.5 million payment in March.

His father Tom said $12 million was their target, with more than $6.5 million needed just for round-the-clock care services.

Constable Marron can longer walk, talk, feed or relieve himself.

The state government announced on Thursday it had agreed to increase the payment to $6 million to assist with trustee fees.

"We're very happy it's come to a conclusion, a good conclusion," Tom Marron told reporters.

"It's for the betterment of Ryan's future and that's all we were looking at all the time.

"I don't think there's been any wins in all of this. It's been a tragic journey.

"There's a long way to go and this will help."

Tom Marron said the figure the family had proposed to the state government would have made life "very, very comfortable, but this makes life comfortable".

"I personally looked at it like a worker's compensation type situation," he said.

WA is the only jurisdiction in Australia without a worker's compensation scheme for police, which it's union has long called for.

WA Police Union president George Tilbury said the issue would be a major part of pre-election submissions.

"It has taken time to get to this point and I guess the frustrating thing for us is if we had a regulated scheme, we wouldn't have to go cap in hand to the government each time a police officer has to be medically retired," he said.

"We will be seeking commitments to make sure that policing into the future is well looked after and we have the resources to do the job."

Medically Retired WA Police Officers Association president David Bentley told AAP he was pleased the payment would give some closure to the Marrons but he was angry it had taken so long.

The fact Const Marron could only now be discharged from the police via a motion of no confidence was an insult, Mr Bentley said.

Const Marron was kept on the payroll while the payment was negotiated.

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