You are using an older browser version. Please use a supported version for the best MSN experience.

Roberta Williams’ son in lockdown: court

AAP logoAAP 17/08/2016 By Melissa Iaria

Being the stepson of murdered drug kingpin Carl Williams has made jail life tough for Tye Stephens, who is spending 23 hours a day in lockdown, a court has heard.

But the eldest son of Melbourne gangland matriarch Roberta Williams is not in Port Phillip's high security Charlotte unit for his crimes, but because of who his relatives are, defence barrister Theo Magazis argued in Sunshine Magistrates Court on Thursday.

Police found Stephens, 29, with an allegedly stolen Colt .45 calibre pistol containing seven rounds, including one in the chamber ready to fire, when they intercepted him in a McDonald's car park at Melton in May.

When they searched his Mitsubishi Lancer, he offered police a crack pipe and said he had used ice the night before.

He also pulled a bag of the drug ice from his pants and told officers the gun was for self protection.

Stephens appeared in court via video link, indicating he will plead guilty to multiple charges relating to the firearm, trafficking ice, handling stolen goods and dealing with $2380 suspected to be proceeds of crime.

He had been in 23-hour lockdown since his May arrest due to safety concerns because of his identity, Mr Magazis said.

He also suffered chronic post traumatic stress due to the events of his family background, something "very few have ever experienced".

A psychological report referred to in court said Stephens was raised in a distressing and traumatic environment, witnessing the most horrific events, including regular police raids at his family home.

"He grew up in a background where family members were murdered, where his stepfather was murdered while in custody," Mr Magazis said.

The issue continued to this day, with the targeted shooting of his late grandfather George Williams' premises, leading to those accused being charged with attempted murder, he said.

Stephens began using cannabis in his early teens but moved on to ice and was using it daily when he committed the crimes.

He was also finding it difficult to deal with the recent death of his grandfather, George Williams.

Mr Magazis argued if Stephens was sentenced to jail, his time would be unnecessarily harsh.

However, police argued this was not the first time Stephens had a pistol - a gun was used in a previous armed robbery he was involved in and he had spent stints in jail.

Magistrate Richard Pithouse agreed Stephen's custody conditions were "almost inhumane" and proposed to sentence him to a combined jail term and community corrections order on August 26.

image beaconimage beaconimage beacon