You are using an older browser version. Please use a supported version for the best MSN experience.

Smith stunned by Pakistan's lack of appeal

AAP logoAAP 16/12/2016 Rob Forsaith

Steve Smith admits he should have been out edging on 97 during the day-night Test, with the skipper stunned Pakistan didn't appeal at the Gabba.

Smith won the toss then put Australia on top of the pink-ball clash with his 16th Test century, dominating day one of the contest.

The right-hander was dropped on 53 but a far more staggering reprieve came when Mohammad Amir delivered the first over with the second new ball.

Smith feathered an edge to keeper Sarfraz Ahmed, which was clearly picked up on HotSpot.

But the tourists didn't hear or see anything at a heaving Gabba, with nobody showing any interest in lodging even a half-hearted appeal.

"I was very surprised. It was pretty loud, obviously I was on 97, there was a bit going on in the crowd," Smith told ABC Radio on Friday.

"But yeah, I did nick it, and no one went up so I wasn't going to walk.

"It was a bit bizarre that nothing actually came of it."

Smith revealed standing umpire Ian Gould told the batsman later in the night "he had no idea" there was an edge.

Even if Gould delivered a not-out verdict, Pakistan could have successfully reviewed the decision to end Smith's impressive knock.

Smith noted there was a sense of deja vu about the incident.

"I reckon (it has happened) once before, and it actually might have even been out here (at the Gabba)," he said.

"I told Gunner Gould at the end of the over - I said 'I think I'm pretty sure I hit that one last over'.

"He said 'you've said that to me before'.

"So it's happened before, I guess you've got to take the good with the bad."

Pakistan opener Azhar Ali admitted on Thursday that nobody "noticed anything, not even a sniff".

"None of our guys went up slightly," Azhar said.

"It was just one of those situations where no one realised what had happened."

Smith was thrilled with his first Test ton of the summer, which started with lopsided losses to South Africa in Perth and Hobart that prompted wholesale changes to the XI.

But the 27-year-old was even more happy with the fight showed by Matt Renshaw and Peter Handscomb, who were both playing their second Test after debuting in Adelaide.

"It's great for Australian cricket ... that we're getting these young guys coming in and doing so well. I thought Matty did beautifully yesterday, he showed he's really got some shots," Smith said.

"We've talked a lot about being resilient and being adaptable to all conditions, and getting through tough periods and earning the right to play the more aggressive way we want to play."

image beaconimage beaconimage beacon