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The day in federal parliament

AAP logoAAP 20/11/2016

TODAY IN FEDERAL PARLIAMENT

* Both the House of Reps and Senate sit this week and next - the final time in 2016.

* The Senate is scheduled to debate government legislation for tougher governance rules on trade unions and their officials.

* Farmers tell MPs a stand-off between the government and Labor over the so-called backpacker tax has done them damage.

* The High Court prepares to hear a challenge against the eligibility of One Nation senator Rod Culleton and former Family First senator Bob Day to contest the July 2 election.

* Question time in both houses at 2pm (AEDT).

WHAT'S MAKING NEWS

* Prime Minister Malcolm Turnbull has held talks with US President Barack Obama and other Asia-Pacific leaders during the APEC summit in Lima, Peru.

* A leading budget watcher forecasts a Donald Trump presidency will not have a significant impact on Australia's federal budget, saying record-low wage growth is a bigger concern.

* The government is on the brink of victory in its bid to legislate two flagship workplace reforms as it offers concessions to Nick Xenophon and other Senate crossbenchers to cement their support.

* Labor MP Graham Perrett will ask parliament to recognise the "unjust" expulsion of Hugh Mahon in 1920.

WHAT'S ON THE AGENDA

* The House of Reps: MPs debate private bills legalising same-sex marriage; the plight of Palestinian children. Debate resumes on government legislation budget changes to veterans payments; suite of other social welfare measures.

* Senate: Senators debate government plan for Registered Organisations Commission; overhaul of vocational education and training loans scheme; register of foreign ownership of agricultural land.

COMPETING ARGUMENTS

* What the coalition wants to spin: Australians need to accept economic reform and more open trade may create winners and losers in the short term, but deliver gains in the long term.

* What Labor wants to pursue: We don't want Australia taken down the US path of low wages and a broken health system; fairness is not about $50 billion in company tax cuts; we want more jobs for Australians and not foreign workers.

WHAT THEY'RE SAYING

"It's not often I have a meeting and nothing to disagree with," Obama tells Turnbull after their last meeting.

"We've got a lot to talk about (including) a big political change in your neighbourhood," Turnbull tells Canadian PM Pierre Trudeau at APEC.

"Indeed, that might come up," Trudeau responds.

TWEETED

@jamesmassola Ray Hadley is asking Scott Morrison about his gall bladder.

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