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The week to come in federal parliament

AAP logoAAP 11/09/2016

THE WEEK AHEAD FOR FEDERAL PARLIAMENT

* Malcolm Turnbull celebrates a year as prime minister on Wednesday.

* Four days of sittings - broadcaster Ray Hadley will be pleased our MPs are working something like a full week - starts on Monday.

* Labor and a crossbench group separately introduce private bills to legalise same-sex marriage.

* MPs debate some of the bills the government introduced in the first week of sittings.

WHILE THEY WERE AWAY

* Turnbull attended the G20 leaders summit in China. He was also at the East Asia Summit in Laos; and the Pacific Islands Forum in Micronesia.

* On the G20 sidelines the PM met with new British leader Theresa May and Chinese president Xi Jinping, where he copped a diplomatic earful over Australia's position on the South China Sea dispute and the treasurer's decision to knock back Chinese bids for electricity distributor Ausgrid.

* Foreign Minister Julie Bishop visited Israel for talks; later she joined Defence Minister Marise Payne for talks in Germany and the UK; Trade Minister Steve Ciobo was in the UK and Europe for free-trade discussions.

* Rising Labor star Sam Dastyari returns to the backbench, falling on his sword after he accepted it was a mistake to seek and obtain personal financial support from Chinese companies with links to Beijing.

* Australia maintained a 25-year unbroken record of economic growth.

WHAT'S ON THE AGENDA

* House of Reps: The government wants to fast-track its omnibus bill containing $6 billion in budget savings; other bills up for debate include business tax cuts; an increase in the threshold for the second highest personal income tax rate; a hike in the tobacco excise; protection for emergency services workers from dodgy workplace agreements.

Possible debate on private bills to legalise same-sex marriage; political donation reform; commission of inquiry into the banking sector.

* Senate: Any government legislation that manages to clear the lower house; consideration of a private Greens bill that aims to legalise same-sex marriage; first speeches by new senators including One Nation's Pauline Hanson on Wednesday.

WHAT BOTH SIDES WANT TO SPIN

* Coalition: We've delivered on the promise to grow the economy - just have a look at the latest GDP numbers showing an annual rate of 3.3pc; anything that embarrasses Bill Shorten and his lack of leadership over the Dastyari affair.

* Labor: We need to ban political donations from overseas; parliament, not voters, should decide the issue of same-sex marriage.

WHAT THEY SAID

"I'm here standing up for Australia. Back home, Bill Shorten is standing up for Sam Dastyari." - Turnbull fires a shot at the opposition leader from Asia.

"Frankly, it's pretty obvious not a lot." - Dastyari when asked what he was thinking when he accepted personal financial support from a Chinese donor.

"Well, by the skin of his teeth he didn't lose to Bill Shorten." - Tony Abbott's former chief of staff Peta Credlin struggled to nominate a Turnbull achievement when prompted by Sky News broadcaster Andrew Bolt.

"We've got record cattle prices, record meat sheep prices, agricultural exports are now second biggest to iron ore, we've got a defence policy that is actually going to defend our nation. We've managed to keep our borders strong. The list goes on." - Deputy Prime Minister Barnaby Joyce managed to think of a few achievements.

TWEETED

"The AB's recollection is correct. I was there. We can't let foreign donations buy our vote, like Ireland's." - Australian Christian Lobby managing director Lyle Shelton on a dispute between Turnbull's office and the Sydney Anglican Archbishop over who was promised what (or not) on same-sex marriage campaign funding.

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