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Time called on Australian made Ford

AAP logoAAP 6/10/2016 Melissa Meehan

The last Australian-made Ford Falcon will come off the production line on Friday.

About 600 workers will lose their jobs - many of them who have spent their entire working lives at the Broadmeadows or Geelong sites and have "Ford blue running through their veins".

Ford Australia spokesman Wesley Sherwood says it has been an emotional time for all involved with the company - especially those who will lose their jobs.

"We've been preparing for this day for three-and-a-half years - it's the end of a 91-year manufacturing legacy in this country," Mr Sherwood told AAP.

"That comes with a lot of camaraderies, decades of service and a hand in making the Falcon a legend in Australia."

Richard Zabielski will retire on Friday after 46 years at the company - he started as an apprentice when he was just 16.

"It's changed my whole life - I grew up with the company," he said.

"It's been a really great career, it's supported my family the whole way through and I'm very proud to be the longest serving employee at Ford Broadmeadows."

Geelong Manufacturing engineer-manager Brian Makin will also retire after joining Ford in 1974.

"Dad had 38 years with the Ford Motoring Company, I also had a brother who worked with Ford - its a bit of legacy with the Makins," he said.

"Here I am coming up 42 years and I haven't regretted any day coming to work."

One hundred and sixty workers will be redeployed into product development roles.

One of them is former maintenance supervisor Andrew Owens who will move to the design studio after 22 years at the company.

"I'm really looking forward to the new role in the design centre - it'll be great," he said.

Holden and Toyota will also close their manufacturing hubs in Australia next year - making locally made cars a thing of the past.

Friday also marks the last production of the Australian made Holden Cruze at its Elizabeth plant in Adelaide.

"It's a difficult time for our entire industry and our thoughts are with the employees of Ford and, of course, Holden's people," Holden said in a statement.

"We're extremely proud of our people and our manufacturing legacy - the best way we can honour our employees and history is by building a bright and successful future."

The government has been working hard to create new jobs in communities hardest hit by the end of manufacturing - providing a Local Industry Fund for Transition for those still looking for work.

New research from Australian Catholic University has revealed only 13 per cent of those within the car manufacturing industry have started looking for new work outside the sector.

The last Australian made Ford is expected to come off the production line at Broadmeadows around 10am on Friday.

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