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Uruguayan passion highlights FFA Cup final

AAP logoAAP 30/11/2016 Ben McKay

Bruno Fornaroli of Melbourne City (L) and Alex Brosque of Sydney FC pose with the FFA Cup. © Michael Dodge/Getty Images Bruno Fornaroli of Melbourne City (L) and Alex Brosque of Sydney FC pose with the FFA Cup. The friendship between Sydney FC and Melbourne City captains Alex Brosque and Bruno Fornaroli will be on hold for Wednesday night's FFA Cup final.

In one sense, it's an unlikely mateship that the two duelling skippers share, given they live in different cities and lead warring clubs.

But their Uruguayan blood meant Brosque sought out the goalscoring revelation when he landed in Australia and a camaraderie grew.

Meeting on Tuesday, Brosque offered Fornaroli a big hug, which the City man almost leaped into.

Their friendship is typical of the relationship between the two clubs, which barely approaches a rivalry.

Coaches Graham Arnold and John van 't Schip shared jokes alongside their captains.

Perhaps they've bonded over a shared loathing of Melbourne Victory, or perhaps it's the player movement between the two sides.

Sydney FC defenders Alex Wilkinson and Michael Zullo moved north at the end of last season with City's blessing as van 't Schip renovated his squad.

Injured winger Corey Gamerio spent two years with Sydney, while goalkeeper Dean Bouzanis also had a spell with the Sky Blues.

Animosities are everywhere in the 10-team A-League, but it seems not between these two sides.

A fight at executive level over City's desire to switch to sky blue kits might be the most strain shown between the two.

Fornaroli praised his former teammate Wilkinson, who was likely to stand against the Uruguayan at AAMI Park.

"He's a fantastic player - a very good defender," he said.

"But I never think too much about other players. I try to play my game, our game.

"Tomorrow is one game to play with joy.

"It's an important game, the first final. We need to play jovially to play good."

Brosque, 33, said his longevity in the game taught him of the importance of relishing major moments such as this.

"You probably appreciate it more as you get older," he said.

"I've played in finals before and they come and you don't notice and they pass you by.

"I know I'm not going to be around for too much longer so I'm definitely enjoying it a bit more.

"Hopefully, there's another one at the end of the year to play for."

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