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US election day: what we know so far

AAP logoAAP 8/11/2016

* Voting has closed in the first states. Kentucky and Indiana polls closed at 10am AEDT

* More than 40 million people, including President Barack Obama, voted early.

* The most recent Republican president, George W Bush, did not vote for Republican candidate Donald Trump or Democrat Hillary Clinton - instead opting for none of the above.

* An exit poll by the AP shows that most people did not want to vote for either Clinton or Trump.

* Trump has again flagged he may not accept the outcome, claiming there has been vote rigging.

* There have been reports some touch-screen voting machines had not been recording their ballots correctly.

* Trump won the first election day votes by a 32-to-25 margin over three New Hampshire districts.

* But Clinton is tipped to win with non-partisan Web site RealClearPolitics on giving her more than an 80 per cent chance of winning the election.

* A judge has knocked back a Trump campaign to preserve votes at four Las Vegas polling places for allegedly breaching laws by allowing people to vote after the lines had closed.

* Clinton and her husband Bill, the 42nd President, voted in their hometown of Chappaqua, New York at 8am local time. Her election night event will be at the Jacob V Javits Center in New York City.

* Trump voted at a school near his Trump Tower in NYC with his wife Melania, daughter Ivanka, and son-in-law Jared. His election night event will be at the Hilton Midtown in Manhattan.

* A North Carolina advocacy group has filed a lawsuit asking that polls in one county be kept open later after problems with electronic voting rolls there earlier in the day.

* Trump's second son Eric may have broken New York state law by tweeting a photo of his completed ballot.

* Two topless women have been charged on summons for protest outside the polling place where Trump was to vote.

* In the other major election of the day, the Democrats are slightly favoured to wrest control of the US Senate from the Republicans - but analysts say it will be tight.

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