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Vic minister pays $192 for dog trip petrol

AAP logoAAP 8/11/2016 Angus Livingston

A Victorian minister can't say exactly how many times he used his taxpayer-funded chauffeur to ferry his dogs between his homes - but he has paid back $192.80 in petrol costs.

Corrections Minister Steve Herbert has also donated $1000 to an animal shelter, after it was revealed his dogs Patch and Ted travelled more than 120 kilometres between his houses in the car while he was at work.

That specific trip from Parkdale to Trentham happened "once, possibly twice".

When Mr Herbert was asked how many times the dogs travelled in the car without him to other locations he could not say.

"There's been a thorough review of the drivers' logs, and the details sought were not recorded," Mr Herbert told Question Time on Tuesday.

Mr Herbert also couldn't say how many times the dogs travelled in the car with him.

"There is no one specific number to that, as I put in my answer, a thorough review of the drivers' logs has been undertaken and an accurate figure is not possible," he said.

Victorian ministerial drivers' logs record the date, speedometer reading, business and personal kilometres travelled, starting location and destination, the passenger, and the purpose of each trip.

When asked if the drivers might be able to help jog Mr Herbert's memory, he replied: "It isn't my intention whatsoever to interrogate the three drivers that I've had."

Premier Daniel Andrews said Mr Herbert had done the wrong thing but he had apologised.

"He's very clear on my expectations and he's made the point publicly and to me that he did the wrong thing, he made an error and he'll be making repayments," Mr Andrews told reporters.

Opposition leader Matthew Guy said just paying for fuel and not the drivers' time was "cheap".

"Steve Herbert's ripped off the taxpayer, he's rorted the system, he should be sacked for that," Mr Guy told reporters.

Mr Herbert also had to declare a new house to parliament after he forgot to include his Trentham home on the register of parliamentary interests.

"It was an inadvertent slip, certainly not deceptive," he said.

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