You are using an older browser version. Please use a supported version for the best MSN experience.

#Showbiz: Chinese celebs say 'No' to eating wildlife

New Straits Times logo New Straits Times 6 days ago Aref Omar
Yook Sung-jae et al. posing for the camera: Chinese celebs have appeared in a video montage to encourage people not to consume exotic wildlife which has been claimed to have been the source of the deadly Covid-19 outbreak originating from Wuhan, China. (Picture from Asia One) © Provided by New Straits Times Chinese celebs have appeared in a video montage to encourage people not to consume exotic wildlife which has been claimed to have been the source of the deadly Covid-19 outbreak originating from Wuhan, China. (Picture from Asia One)

KUALA LUMPUR: With the Covid-19 outbreak reported to have originated from a wildlife market in Wuhan, China, Chinese celebrities have banded together to encourage people to refrain from that particular eating habit.

According to Asia One, 17 stars, including Kris Wu, Angelababy, Huang Xiaoming, Liu Tao, Angel Wang and Yang Mi, have pledged to stop eating exotic animals in a video montage.

The roughly 60-second clip, that has gone viral on Weibo, features the celebs advising viewers to, "Say no to the consumption of wildlife," and that, "To save wildlife is to save ourselves."

Apparently, this kind of gastronomic indulgence is still very prevalent in China and in some parts of the world as well.

At the end of the video Kris Wu is seen saying, "Pray for Wuhan. Together we will win the battle against NCP (novel coronavirus pneumonia or Covid-19)."

News reports state that there are so far over 60,107 cases and 1363 deaths, mostly in China, since the Covid-19 outbreak began last December.

© New Straits Times Press (M) Bhd

More on MSN News:

Hunt on for 'patient zero' who spread coronavirus globally from SG

Coronavirus: eight new cases in Singapore, bringing total to 58

The Wuhan coronavirus has reportedly spread to North Korea

Gruesome Valentine's Day murders

Also on MSN: 

These animals spread deadly diseases

(Provided by StarsInsider)


More From New Straits Times

New Straits Times
New Straits Times
image beaconimage beaconimage beacon