You are using an older browser version. Please use a supported version for the best MSN experience.

Jamie Oliver breaks down in tears talking to staff at collapsed restaurant chain

Mirror logo Mirror 23/8/2019 James Brinsford
UP NEXT
UP NEXT

Jamie Oliver has broken down in tears when recalling that he 'got cocky' before the collapse of his restaurant empire.

The 44-year-old chef opened up on Channel 4 documentary Jamie Oliver: The Naked Chef Bares All, in which he admitted to his non-restaurant staff the mistakes he made before a majority of his outlets were plunged into administration.

Jamie Oliver et al. posing for the camera: Jamie Oliver spoke to his staff at his Fifteen restaurants © Provided by Reach Publishing Services Limited Jamie Oliver spoke to his staff at his Fifteen restaurants Addressing his staff on the episode, Jamie admitted: "It's a really tough one. For many, many months now I have been walking around the office and you have been like 'Jamie, are you alright' and I have gone 'Yes' but the truth was no I'm f------ not, it's f-----.

"I am utterly devastated, financially I have exhausted everything I could, I used every card, I used every trick, I used every contact."

a man looking at the camera: Jamie broke down in tears © Channel 4 Jamie broke down in tears

Jamie went on to admit that his attitude may have not helped. He continued: "We got cocky, we thought anything we did would work.

"Massive lessons learnt, I will never make them again, never again, never again, never again."

Jamie Oliver, Davina McCall standing in a room: Jamie with Davina McCall © Paul Stuart Jamie with Davina McCall

Jamie broke down in tears when speaking to documentary host, Davina McCall, as the pair visited the site of his first Fifteen restaurant, in London.

Standing in the abandoned venue, the chef said: "It is really eerie and I don't like it.

"I don't know, it is like in the films when the bomb has gone off and everyone has to leave and everything is just left.

a store inside of a building: The unit once occupied by Jamie's Italian is still vacant © Provided by Reach Publishing Services Limited The unit once occupied by Jamie's Italian is still vacant

"My god, it's tough. I have been so stressed, I have been, it's gone.

"Over there on the pillar, there were two plaques from students who had died."

Jamie opened up about how quickly the business collapsed and how that meant that staff were unaware until it was too late.

a man and a woman standing in a room: Jamie explains to Davina what happened © Channel 4 Jamie explains to Davina what happened

He continued: "Sadly you can't practically give employees notice that you are about to make them redundant in administration.

"It is just not practical, administrators take over executive control, we are appointed by the court.

"So what happened was we had to move quickly. The hard part of this particular case was that only a relatively small number of employees, percentage wise, were there at that particular time."

Jamie Oliver standing in front of a table: Jamie admits he got cocky before the collapse of his business © Paul Stuart Jamie admits he got cocky before the collapse of his business

Jamie then explained how he shared the news of the business going under: "We invite all employees to conference calls which we lead and we give people the bad news sadly, which is awful.

"But there is no other way to do it."

Jamie then added: "The staff got paid up to the date, I made sure of that.

"I just did my best and I couldn't do it this time.

Jamie Oliver standing in front of a brick building: The documentary explores what went wrong with his business © Paul Stuart The documentary explores what went wrong with his business

"Without question the most painful regret when a business dies is having to tell staff that you care about , that have worked really hard for you, that they haven't got a job anymore."

Jamie explained to Davina what he thought had gone wrong: "To survive in this industry is really tough, I was very naive at the time.

"I was good at running one restaurant but I wouldn't call myself a businessman.

Jamie Oliver et al. sitting on a bench: Davina McCall, Buddy, Jamie, Petal and Jools Oliver © Paul Stuart Davina McCall, Buddy, Jamie, Petal and Jools Oliver

"I'm good at quite a few things but not necessarily brilliant at everything and I did plenty wrong.

"I opened a lot of big restaurants and I think people like small-medium sized restaurants.

"You have these big cathedrals that you can't fill."

Pictures: Celebrity chefs: Then and now


More from The Mirror

image beaconimage beaconimage beacon