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53 Healthy Chicken Recipes That Are Beyond Easy to Make

Eat This, Not That! Logo By Eat This, Not That! Editors of Eat This, Not That! | Slide 1 of 54: Although there are numerous sources of protein available, ranging from beans and veggies to fish and beef, chicken is by far one of the most popular sources—and it’s easy to see why: It’s affordable, easy to prepare, and lower in fat than many other types of meat.But here’s the dilemma: There are only so many grilled chicken breasts you can eat before you get bored and turn to more flavorful ideas that often come with a big dose of unwanted calories. That’s why we plucked out some of our favorites from the Eat This, Not That! archives for the most delicious poultry creations you can easily make at home.Add some of these 53 healthy chicken recipes for weight loss to your weekly lineup, and ditch chicken boredom once and for all. But before you check out the recipes, here are some helpful tips that will help you make sure your chicken recipe is safe to eat and delicious. And if you’re looking for even more dishes to add to your weekly roundup, make sure you check out 18 Healthy Salmon Recipes You’ll Love!How do you properly store chicken in the fridge?”You want to store your chicken on the bottom of the fridge, under any cooked or raw products,” says Patrick Ochs, corporate executive chef at Pubblica Italiana and Dalia at The Celino Hotel. If you’re storing your container of leftover pasta under a couple of slabs of red meat, you definitely want to reconsider. Why? The last thing you want is the raw juices seeping into your already cooked food because it could cause foodborne illness.Why shouldn’t you wash raw chicken?Washing raw chicken is a no-go. As Meredith Carothers, the technical information specialist at the USDA’s Food Safety and Inspection Service told us in a former article that washing raw chicken in the sink increases the risk of cross-contamination.”By rinsing chicken meat, there is a potential to spread foodborne illness bacteria, like Salmonella or Campylobacter, to other surfaces or utensils,” she said. “If these surfaces or utensils are not cleaned or sanitized, it could spread to ready-to-eat foods and cause foodborne illness.”How can you tell when raw chicken has gone bad?Head chef of HelloFresh, Claudia Sidoti had previously told us in a different article that there are three main signs that indicate raw chicken has gone bad.”Fresh, raw chicken should have a pink, fleshy color. As it starts to go bad, the color fades to a shade of gray. If the color starts to look duller, you should use it immediately,” she said. Once that meat turns gray, toss it!Another way is to smell it. If emits a potent, sour smell remove it from the fridge and throw away outside immediately.Thirdly, the chef instructed us to touch the meat, “Raw chicken naturally has a glossy, slimy texture. However, if the slime remains after rinsing underwater, it likely went bad.”How long should you marinate your chicken for?”Depending on how much salt you use in your marinade, you can ideally marinate for days. I prefer to marinate for at least 24 hours to really penetrate the meat with flavor,” says Ochs.Should you add salt to your marinade?”I personally prefer to add salt to my marinade, especially for large cuts of meat,” says Ochs. “Depending on how much salt you use in the marinade, also limits the time you keep it on. Adding salts allow the meat to be evenly seasoned.”RELATED: These are the easy, at-home recipes that help you lose weight.

53 Healthy Chicken Recipes That Are Beyond Easy to Make

Although there are numerous sources of protein available, ranging from beans and veggies to fish and beef, chicken is by far one of the most popular sources—and it’s easy to see why: It’s affordable, easy to prepare, and lower in fat than many other types of meat.

But here’s the dilemma: There are only so many grilled chicken breasts you can eat before you get bored and turn to more flavorful ideas that often come with a big dose of unwanted calories. That’s why we plucked out some of our favorites from the Eat This, Not That! archives for the most delicious poultry creations you can easily make at home.

Add some of these 53 healthy chicken recipes for weight loss to your weekly lineup, and ditch chicken boredom once and for all. But before you check out the recipes, here are some helpful tips that will help you make sure your chicken recipe is safe to eat and delicious. And if you’re looking for even more dishes to add to your weekly roundup, make sure you check out 18 Healthy Salmon Recipes You’ll Love!

How do you properly store chicken in the fridge?

”You want to store your chicken on the bottom of the fridge, under any cooked or raw products,” says Patrick Ochs, corporate executive chef at Pubblica Italiana and Dalia at The Celino Hotel. If you’re storing your container of leftover pasta under a couple of slabs of red meat, you definitely want to reconsider. Why? The last thing you want is the raw juices seeping into your already cooked food because it could cause foodborne illness.

Why shouldn’t you wash raw chicken?

Washing raw chicken is a no-go. As Meredith Carothers, the technical information specialist at the USDA’s Food Safety and Inspection Service told us in a former article that washing raw chicken in the sink increases the risk of cross-contamination.

”By rinsing chicken meat, there is a potential to spread foodborne illness bacteria, like Salmonella or Campylobacter, to other surfaces or utensils,” she said. “If these surfaces or utensils are not cleaned or sanitized, it could spread to ready-to-eat foods and cause foodborne illness.”

How can you tell when raw chicken has gone bad?

Head chef of HelloFresh, Claudia Sidoti had previously told us in a different article that there are three main signs that indicate raw chicken has gone bad.

”Fresh, raw chicken should have a pink, fleshy color. As it starts to go bad, the color fades to a shade of gray. If the color starts to look duller, you should use it immediately,” she said. Once that meat turns gray, toss it!

Another way is to smell it. If emits a potent, sour smell remove it from the fridge and throw away outside immediately.

Thirdly, the chef instructed us to touch the meat, “Raw chicken naturally has a glossy, slimy texture. However, if the slime remains after rinsing underwater, it likely went bad.”

How long should you marinate your chicken for?

”Depending on how much salt you use in your marinade, you can ideally marinate for days. I prefer to marinate for at least 24 hours to really penetrate the meat with flavor,” says Ochs.

Should you add salt to your marinade?

”I personally prefer to add salt to my marinade, especially for large cuts of meat,” says Ochs. “Depending on how much salt you use in the marinade, also limits the time you keep it on. Adding salts allow the meat to be evenly seasoned.”

RELATED: These are the easy, at-home recipes that help you lose weight.

© Mitch Mandel and Thomas MacDonald

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