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What caffeine does to your body and brain

By Kevin Loria,Erin Brodwin of Business Insider | Slide 1 of 14: <p>Many of us can't start our day without a jolt of caffeine.</p><p> Various <a href="http://www.businessinsider.com/caffeine-daily-serving-2017-6?utm_source=msn.com&utm_medium=referral&utm_content=msn-slideshow&utm_campaign=bodyurl">caffeinated drinks</a> affect your health in different ways - a new study shows coffee <a href="http://www.businessinsider.com/coffee-health-benefits-longer-life-2017-7?utm_source=msn.com&utm_medium=referral&utm_content=msn-slideshow&utm_campaign=bodyurl"> seems to be associated with longer life</a>, while many energy drinks have surprisingly <a href="http://www.businessinsider.com/sweetest-sodas-teas-coffees-energy-drinks-us-2017-7?utm_source=msn.com&utm_medium=referral&utm_content=msn-slideshow&utm_campaign=bodyurl"> high sugar levels</a>.</p><p> Caffeine itself is a stimulant with some positive and negative effects. It makes most of us feel more alert, awake, and focused, but too much can also backfire.</p><p> It also affects a host of processes in our bodies, including our digestion, metabolism, and vision. </p><p> Here's what's really going on after you drink a cup of joe.</p>

Many of us can't start our day without a jolt of caffeine.

Various caffeinated drinks affect your health in different ways - a new study shows coffee seems to be associated with longer life, while many energy drinks have surprisingly high sugar levels.

Caffeine itself is a stimulant with some positive and negative effects. It makes most of us feel more alert, awake, and focused, but too much can also backfire.

It also affects a host of processes in our bodies, including our digestion, metabolism, and vision.

Here's what's really going on after you drink a cup of joe.

© Flickr/Daniel Foster

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