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Hidden dangers of the keto diet

The Daily Meal Logo By Holly Van Hare of The Daily Meal | Slide 1 of 13: The keto diet sure sounds great. A fast track to weight loss where you can eat all the red meat, bacon and butter you want? For breakfast, you can totally order “a bacon, egg, and cheese — hold the bagel” and it’s keto-approved. Is this diet too good to be true?For those unfamiliar with keto, this diet first came to be as a last-resort solution for treating epilepsy. It entails restricting carbohydrate intake enough to maintain what’s called “ketosis,” a state the human body resorts to when it has no carbohydrates to use for fuel. Rather than use carbs to quickly create glucose (the compound the body uses for energy), the body must take from stores of fat and slowly transform them into glucose. The resulting process produces ketones as a chemical byproduct. The idea (whether or not it’s actually true) is that when the body must burn fat for fuel, body fat will burn faster, as well.Overall, the science is a little shaky on this popular wellness trend. Some doctors and specialists praise the keto diet for the short-term weight loss it promises, alongside other suggested benefits such as blood sugar control. (Long-term research has yet to be conducted on the keto diet’s effect on both weight loss and blood sugar.) And many anecdotal accounts glowingly describe adherents’ individual experiences with the diet.But there’s a need for more research on what actually happens to your body when you deprive it of carbs. And of the research that has been done, there isn’t much public awareness. There are some hidden dangers of eating keto that you should probably know about before you try.

keto diet dangers

The keto diet sure sounds great. A fast track to weight loss where you can eat all the red meat, bacon and butter you want? For breakfast, you can totally order “a bacon, egg, and cheese — hold the bagel” and it’s keto-approved. Is this diet too good to be true?

For those unfamiliar with keto, this diet first came to be as a last-resort solution for treating epilepsy. It entails restricting carbohydrate intake enough to maintain what’s called “ketosis,” a state the human body resorts to when it has no carbohydrates to use for fuel. Rather than use carbs to quickly create glucose (the compound the body uses for energy), the body must take from stores of fat and slowly transform them into glucose. The resulting process produces ketones as a chemical byproduct. The idea (whether or not it’s actually true) is that when the body must burn fat for fuel, body fat will burn faster, as well.

Overall, the science is a little shaky on this popular wellness trend. Some doctors and specialists praise the keto diet for the short-term weight loss it promises, alongside other suggested benefits such as blood sugar control. (Long-term research has yet to be conducted on the keto diet’s effect on both weight loss and blood sugar.) And many anecdotal accounts glowingly describe adherents’ individual experiences with the diet.

But there’s a need for more research on what actually happens to your body when you deprive it of carbs. And of the research that has been done, there isn’t much public awareness. There are some hidden dangers of eating keto that you should probably know about before you try.

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