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The DASH diet is more than half carbs, and experts say it's one of the healthiest ways to eat

INSIDER Logo By Gabby Landsverk of INSIDER | Slide 1 of 7: 
  
    The DASH diet,
    created to help lower blood pressure and promote heart health,
    has been consistently ranked by experts as one of the
    healthiest ways to eat.
  
  
    Nutritionists say the eating plan can also help with
    weight
    loss in some cases by cutting out processed foods and
    sugar.
  
  
    DASH includes plenty of fresh produce, whole grains,
    and nuts, and a moderate amount of lean meat and low-fat dairy.
    
  
  
    Here are six food groups you'll eat a lot of on the
    DASH diet. 
  
  
    
      Visit Insider's
    homepage for more. 
    
  

  DASH stands
  for dietary approaches to stop hypertension and was developed
  in the early 1990s when the National Institutes of Health was
  researching ways to 
  lower blood pressure.

  It emphasizes low-sodium, nutrient-dense foods like fresh
  vegetables and fruits, along with whole grains, nuts, seeds, and
  legumes. It also includes low-fat dairy and lean meat in
  moderation.

  Although not specifically intended for weight loss, the DASH diet
  has been shown in some studies to
  help people lose weight by helping them cut back on processed
  foods and salty or sugary snacks. 

  No foods are forbidden on the diet, but the plan suggests
  limiting sugary items like candy, cookies, and soda to fewer than
  five servings a week, and limiting alcohol to no more than one
  serving a day for women and two for men, per CDC
  recommendations. 

  The diet also recommends cutting back on red meat, fat, and
  sodium. 

  If you are looking to lose, maintain, or gain weight, the DASH
  diet offers 
  several calorie levels, from 1,600 calories a day to 3,000. 

  While the diet "is very safe and sustainable for anybody who's
  looking to eat healthier," registered dietitian Lisa Sasson
  previously
  told Insider, a possible pitfall of the plan is that it
  includes very broad recommendations, and some people may need
  more specific guidance if they lack experience in cooking or meal
  planning, according to 
  Harvard Health.

  Otherwise, here's what you can expect to eat on DASH.

  • The DASH diet, created to help lower blood pressure and promote heart health, has been consistently ranked by experts as one of the healthiest ways to eat.
  • Nutritionists say the eating plan can also help with weight loss in some cases by cutting out processed foods and sugar.
  • DASH includes plenty of fresh produce, whole grains, and nuts, and a moderate amount of lean meat and low-fat dairy.
  • Here are six food groups you'll eat a lot of on the DASH diet.
  • Visit Insider's homepage for more.

DASH stands for dietary approaches to stop hypertension and was developed in the early 1990s when the National Institutes of Health was researching ways to lower blood pressure.

It emphasizes low-sodium, nutrient-dense foods like fresh vegetables and fruits, along with whole grains, nuts, seeds, and legumes. It also includes low-fat dairy and lean meat in moderation.

Although not specifically intended for weight loss, the DASH diet has been shown in some studies to help people lose weight by helping them cut back on processed foods and salty or sugary snacks.

No foods are forbidden on the diet, but the plan suggests limiting sugary items like candy, cookies, and soda to fewer than five servings a week, and limiting alcohol to no more than one serving a day for women and two for men, per CDC recommendations.

The diet also recommends cutting back on red meat, fat, and sodium.

If you are looking to lose, maintain, or gain weight, the DASH diet offers several calorie levels, from 1,600 calories a day to 3,000.

While the diet "is very safe and sustainable for anybody who's looking to eat healthier," registered dietitian Lisa Sasson previously told Insider, a possible pitfall of the plan is that it includes very broad recommendations, and some people may need more specific guidance if they lack experience in cooking or meal planning, according to Harvard Health.

Otherwise, here's what you can expect to eat on DASH.

© gbh007/ iStock

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