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​6 Times You May Need To Eat MORE Salt

Prevention Logo By Markham Heid of Prevention | Slide 1 of 6: Athletes who engage in intense exercise for prolonged periods of time—an hour or more—may at times need a sodium boost, Dubost says. “Hyponatremia can occur, which is a drop of sodium in the blood resulting in dizziness, confusion, weakness, and even death,” she explains. While it’s not common, hyponatremia can occur when people are sweating hard and pounding lots of water to rehydrate, but aren’t replacing the sodium their bodies shed while perspiring. If you’ve just wrapped up a grueling, shirt-soaking workout—or if, during an endurance event, you’re experiencing any of the symptoms Dubost mentioned—eating some salty foods can help your body recover. (Try these 13 good-for-you salty snacks.)Here's how to make your own rehydrating drink:

You’re partaking in some marathon-intensity exercise.

Athletes who engage in intense exercise for prolonged periods of time—an hour or more—may at times need a sodium boost, Dubost says. “Hyponatremia can occur, which is a drop of sodium in the blood resulting in dizziness, confusion, weakness, and even death,” she explains. While it’s not common, hyponatremia can occur when people are sweating hard and pounding lots of water to rehydrate, but aren’t replacing the sodium their bodies shed while perspiring. If you’ve just wrapped up a grueling, shirt-soaking workout—or if, during an endurance event, you’re experiencing any of the symptoms Dubost mentioned—eating some salty foods can help your body recover. (Try these 13 good-for-you salty snacks.)

Here's how to make your own rehydrating drink:

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