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The Best Ways to Prevent Mosquito Bites, According to Experts

Country Living Logo By Maria Carter, Blair Donovan of Country Living | Slide 1 of 29: You’re not the only one looking forward to fun summer activities. Pesky mosquitos also enjoy warmer weather, so it's best to prepare to share the great outdoors with a few insect friends. Getting rid of them isn't as easy as getting rid of stinkbugs, and nothing’s more annoying than scratching at red, itchy bug bites on your skin or hearing buzzing around your ears. And on a more serious level, the itty-bitty insects can also cause some dangerous health concerns.  According to Joseph Conlon, technical advisor for the American Mosquito Control Association, mosquito-borne diseases—like malaria, Zika virus, Dengue fever, chikungunya, yellow fever, and West Nile Virus—have been on the rise over the past few years. One of the main mosquito culprits? Primary transmitter Aedes aegypti, or yellow fever mosquito, which is often found in areas with high human populations and is present in most of the 50 states. Why do I keep getting bitten by mosquitoes?It's true—some people are more susceptible to bites than others, but we have little control over the main deciding factor: genetics. Mosquitoes can be attracted to different chemicals (like lactic acid) found in human skin. Your skin's chemical makeup, combined with your blood type and metabolic rate, can determine whether they see you as a "snack" or not. (Higher metabolic rates mean that your body is producing more carbon dioxide, which tends to attract more mosquitoes.)Ultimately, a mosquito's attraction to your blood comes down to one major component: biology. "The human body gives off about 300 different odors, and we've found that some of them are repellent to mosquitoes and some of them are attractive," says Conlon. Basically, some people are just more mosquito-prone than others based on how their body metabolizes.How do I stop getting bitten by mosquitos?Just because mosquitoes are likely an inevitable part of summer activities doesn't mean you’re left totally defenseless. To protect yourself and your family, we tapped the experts on how to prevent mosquito bites all season long. Insect and mosquito repellent is a no-brainer, but what are the best ingredients to look for? And does eating garlic really have these aggressive bloodsuckers running for the hills? Check out the best plans of attack in order to stay bite-free, as well as common mosquito myths and misconceptions addressed.

You’re not the only one looking forward to fun summer activities. Pesky mosquitos also enjoy warmer weather, so it's best to prepare to share the great outdoors with a few insect friends. Getting rid of them isn't as easy as getting rid of stinkbugs, and nothing’s more annoying than scratching at red, itchy bug bites on your skin or hearing buzzing around your ears. And on a more serious level, the itty-bitty insects can also cause some dangerous health concerns.

According to Joseph Conlon, technical advisor for the American Mosquito Control Association, mosquito-borne diseases—like malaria, Zika virus, Dengue fever, chikungunya, yellow fever, and West Nile Virus—have been on the rise over the past few years. One of the main mosquito culprits? Primary transmitter Aedes aegypti, or yellow fever mosquito, which is often found in areas with high human populations and is present in most of the 50 states.

Why do I keep getting bitten by mosquitoes?

It's true—some people are more susceptible to bites than others, but we have little control over the main deciding factor: genetics. Mosquitoes can be attracted to different chemicals (like lactic acid) found in human skin. Your skin's chemical makeup, combined with your blood type and metabolic rate, can determine whether they see you as a "snack" or not. (Higher metabolic rates mean that your body is producing more carbon dioxide, which tends to attract more mosquitoes.)

Ultimately, a mosquito's attraction to your blood comes down to one major component: biology. "The human body gives off about 300 different odors, and we've found that some of them are repellent to mosquitoes and some of them are attractive," says Conlon. Basically, some people are just more mosquito-prone than others based on how their body metabolizes.

How do I stop getting bitten by mosquitos?

Just because mosquitoes are likely an inevitable part of summer activities doesn't mean you’re left totally defenseless. To protect yourself and your family, we tapped the experts on how to prevent mosquito bites all season long. Insect and mosquito repellent is a no-brainer, but what are the best ingredients to look for? And does eating garlic really have these aggressive bloodsuckers running for the hills? Check out the best plans of attack in order to stay bite-free, as well as common mosquito myths and misconceptions addressed.

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