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The Type of Coconut Oil to Avoid If You Don't Want a Breakout

PopSugar Logo By Kirbie Johnson of PopSugar | Slide 3 of 5: De Sousa caveats her ceramides comment by adding that coconut oil has a large molecular structure, meaning it doesn't absorb into the epidermis and can create a film on the skin, resulting in dehydration. "I see this each time clients exclusively use oils for their skin care," she said.  De Sousa says that even though the skin initially feels silky and soft, the effect is only temporary since you're not properly moisturizing the skin. When you apply coconut oil, you're telling your skin that it doesn't need to produce as much natural oils. This ultimately dries it out in the long run and can lead to "microscopic cracking," irritation, and stress, according to de Sousa. Additionally, coconut is, well, a nut and can affect those with nut allergies.

Truth #2: It Will Dry Out Your Skin . . . Eventually

De Sousa caveats her ceramides comment by adding that coconut oil has a large molecular structure, meaning it doesn't absorb into the epidermis and can create a film on the skin, resulting in dehydration. "I see this each time clients exclusively use oils for their skin care," she said.

De Sousa says that even though the skin initially feels silky and soft, the effect is only temporary since you're not properly moisturizing the skin. When you apply coconut oil, you're telling your skin that it doesn't need to produce as much natural oils. This ultimately dries it out in the long run and can lead to "microscopic cracking," irritation, and stress, according to de Sousa. Additionally, coconut is, well, a nut and can affect those with nut allergies.

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