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15 Cities With the Most Workers Who Sit Versus Stand

Money Talks News Logo By Hire A Helper Editors of Money Talks News | Slide 1 of 17: Editor's Note: This story originally appeared on HireAHelper. In recent years, public health officials have been trying to raise awareness of the negative effects of a common daily activity: sitting. While sitting can be helpful for resting and maintaining the body, sitting for prolonged periods with limited physical activity reduces energy expenditure and cardiovascular fitness, which contributes to a number of adverse health conditions. Sitting can increase the likelihood of obesity, blood clots, high blood pressure, high blood sugar, and high cholesterol. It may also increase the risk of heart disease, diabetes, and even cancer. It affects posture, stiffens joints, and contributes to tightness and strain in the back, hamstrings, and hips. With this long list of potential health consequences, some health professionals argue that “sitting is the new smoking.” To determine the locations with the highest concentration of workers who sit, researchers at HireAHelper used data from O*NET’s Occupation-Level Sitting Score and the U.S. Bureau of Labor Statistics Occupational Employment and Wage Statistics. Here are the cities with the highest concentration of workers who sit. It’s not the usual blah, blah, blah. Click here to sign up for our free newsletter. Sponsored: Add $1.7 million to your retirement A recent Vanguard study revealed a self-managed $500,000 investment grows into an average $1.7 million in 25 years. But under the care of a pro, the average is $3.4 million. That’s an extra $1.7 million! Maybe that’s why the wealthy use investment pros and why you should too. How? With SmartAsset’s free  financial adviser matching tool. In five minutes you’ll have up to three qualified local pros, each legally required to act in your best interests. Most offer free first consultations. What have you got to lose? Click here to check it out right now.

15 Cities With the Most Workers Who Sit Versus Stand

Editor's Note: This story originally appeared on HireAHelper.

In recent years, public health officials have been trying to raise awareness of the negative effects of a common daily activity: sitting.

While sitting can be helpful for resting and maintaining the body, sitting for prolonged periods with limited physical activity reduces energy expenditure and cardiovascular fitness, which contributes to a number of adverse health conditions. Sitting can increase the likelihood of obesity, blood clots, high blood pressure, high blood sugar, and high cholesterol.

It may also increase the risk of heart disease, diabetes, and even cancer. It affects posture, stiffens joints, and contributes to tightness and strain in the back, hamstrings, and hips. With this long list of potential health consequences, some health professionals argue that “sitting is the new smoking.”

To determine the locations with the highest concentration of workers who sit, researchers at HireAHelper used data from O*NET’s Occupation-Level Sitting Score and the U.S. Bureau of Labor Statistics Occupational Employment and Wage Statistics.

Here are the cities with the highest concentration of workers who sit.

It’s not the usual blah, blah, blah. Click here to sign up for our free newsletter.

Sponsored: Add $1.7 million to your retirement

A recent Vanguard study revealed a self-managed $500,000 investment grows into an average $1.7 million in 25 years. But under the care of a pro, the average is $3.4 million. That’s an extra $1.7 million!

Maybe that’s why the wealthy use investment pros and why you should too. How? With SmartAsset’s free financial adviser matching tool. In five minutes you’ll have up to three qualified local pros, each legally required to act in your best interests. Most offer free first consultations. What have you got to lose? Click here to check it out right now.

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