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What Happens to Your Body After Losing 10 Pounds

Eat This, Not That! Logo By Amy Sowder of Eat This, Not That! | Slide 3 of 14: When you lose 10 pounds, you’re sleeping better at night, which means your cortisol levels are lower. Lower cortisol levels equate to less stress and cravings for sugary and fatty foods. “People get better sleep, and sleep apnea can ease,” says Fiorella DiCarlo, R.D.N. and C.D.N. Carrying excess weight can put you at risk for sleep apnea, a sleep disorder in which the airway becomes blocked while snoozing, according to Harvard Women’s Health Watch.People who are overweight have extra tissue in the back of their throat, which can fall down over the airway and block the flow of air into the lungs while they sleep. The American College of Physicians emphasizes lifestyle modifications—especially weight loss—for treating obstructive sleep apnea. Losing just 5 to 10 percent of body weight can have a big effect on sleep apnea symptoms.

2. Sleep Better

When you lose 10 pounds, you’re sleeping better at night, which means your cortisol levels are lower. Lower cortisol levels equate to less stress and cravings for sugary and fatty foods. “People get better sleep, and sleep apnea can ease,” says Fiorella DiCarlo, R.D.N. and C.D.N. Carrying excess weight can put you at risk for sleep apnea, a sleep disorder in which the airway becomes blocked while snoozing, according to Harvard Women’s Health Watch.

People who are overweight have extra tissue in the back of their throat, which can fall down over the airway and block the flow of air into the lungs while they sleep. The American College of Physicians emphasizes lifestyle modifications—especially weight loss—for treating obstructive sleep apnea. Losing just 5 to 10 percent of body weight can have a big effect on sleep apnea symptoms.

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