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The Wuhan coronavirus has killed more people in 6 weeks than SARS did in 8 months. Here's how the 2 outbreaks compare.

Business Insider Logo By Aylin Woodward of Business Insider | Slide 1 of 19: 
  A 
    coronavirus outbreak that originated in Wuhan, China, has
    killed at least 1,100 people and infected more than 44,500
    since December.
  
  The virus might have 
    jumped from animals to people at a Chinese 
    wet market where live and dead animals were being sold.
  
  
    
    SARS was also a coronavirus, and that outbreak started in a
    wet market, too. It killed 774 people and infected 8,098
    between November 2002 and July 2003.
  
  The new coronavirus, officially known as COVID-19, has
  
    killed more people in six weeks than SARS did in eight
    months.
  
  COVID-19 shares 80% of its genome with SARS, 
    according to recent research.
  
  
    Visit
    Business Insider's homepage for more stories.
  

  A coronavirus
  that originated in Wuhan, China has 
  killed more people in six weeks than severe acute respiratory
  syndrome (SARS) did in eight months.

  More than 1,100 people have died from the Wuhan coronavirus, and
  
  at least 44,500 have been infected across 26 countries. (For
  the latest case total, death toll, and travel information, see
  Business Insider's live updates 
  here.)

  The new virus, which is marked by fevers and pneumonia-like
  symptoms, conjured a sense of déja vu for some who remember the
  SARS outbreak that started in November 2002. SARS was also a
  coronavirus, and it jumped to people from animals in wet markets,
  which the new coronavirus probably did, too. The two viruses
  share 80%
  of their genetic codes.

  Experts
  called SARS "the first pandemic of the 21st century," since
  it spread across 29 countries. The virus emerged in Guangdong and
  infected 8,098 people over the course of eight months, killing
  774. Just a month after the first confirmed case of the novel
  coronavirus, the total global case count 
  surpassed that of SARS. 

  The new coronavirus - now officially known as COVID-19 - 
  appears to be less deadly than SARS, however. The mortality
  rate for SARS was 9.6%, whereas the Wuhan coronavirus seems to
  kill 
  between 1% and 2% of those infected.

  "In essence, it's a version of SARS that spreads more easily but
  causes less damage," Ian Jones, a virologist at the University of
  Reading in the UK, said on February 3.

  Here are some of the crucial differences between this outbreak
  and the SARS pandemic 17 years ago.

  • A coronavirus outbreak that originated in Wuhan, China, has killed at least 1,100 people and infected more than 44,500 since December.
  • The virus might have jumped from animals to people at a Chinese wet market where live and dead animals were being sold.
  • SARS was also a coronavirus, and that outbreak started in a wet market, too. It killed 774 people and infected 8,098 between November 2002 and July 2003.
  • The new coronavirus, officially known as COVID-19, has killed more people in six weeks than SARS did in eight months.
  • COVID-19 shares 80% of its genome with SARS, according to recent research.

A coronavirus that originated in Wuhan, China has killed more people in six weeks than severe acute respiratory syndrome (SARS) did in eight months.

More than 1,100 people have died from the Wuhan coronavirus, and at least 44,500 have been infected across 26 countries. (For the latest case total, death toll, and travel information, see Business Insider's live updates here.)

The new virus, which is marked by fevers and pneumonia-like symptoms, conjured a sense of déja vu for some who remember the SARS outbreak that started in November 2002. SARS was also a coronavirus, and it jumped to people from animals in wet markets, which the new coronavirus probably did, too. The two viruses share 80% of their genetic codes.

Experts called SARS "the first pandemic of the 21st century," since it spread across 29 countries. The virus emerged in Guangdong and infected 8,098 people over the course of eight months, killing 774. Just a month after the first confirmed case of the novel coronavirus, the total global case count surpassed that of SARS.

The new coronavirus - now officially known as COVID-19 - appears to be less deadly than SARS, however. The mortality rate for SARS was 9.6%, whereas the Wuhan coronavirus seems to kill between 1% and 2% of those infected.

"In essence, it's a version of SARS that spreads more easily but causes less damage," Ian Jones, a virologist at the University of Reading in the UK, said on February 3.

Here are some of the crucial differences between this outbreak and the SARS pandemic 17 years ago.

© Christian Keenan/Getty Images

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