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Singapore Airlines Fires Pilot for Failing Pre-Flight Alcohol Test

Bloomberg logo Bloomberg 11/1/2019 Kyunghee Park
a large passenger jet sitting on top of a runway: Singapore Airlines Ltd. aircraft stand on the tarmac at Changi Airport in Singapore, on Thursday, Dec. 13, 2018. Singapore's Changi Airport, voted the world's best for the past six years by Skytrax, is pursuing that goal of extensive automation with such vigor that it built Terminal 4 to help test the airport bots of the future. © Bloomberg Singapore Airlines Ltd. aircraft stand on the tarmac at Changi Airport in Singapore, on Thursday, Dec. 13, 2018. Singapore's Changi Airport, voted the world's best for the past six years by Skytrax, is pursuing that goal of extensive automation with such vigor that it built Terminal 4 to help test the airport bots of the future.

(Bloomberg) -- More pilots in Asia are showing up sloshed to work.

Singapore Airlines Ltd. became the latest carrier to report dealing with inebriated staff, firing a pilot for failing an alcohol test in September before a flight from Melbourne. The employment of the pilot, who wasn’t identified, was terminated after a random check by Australia’s Civil Aviation Safety Authority found “higher than suitable blood alcohol limit,” Singapore Airlines said in an emailed statement to Bloomberg News Friday.

There’s been a spate of alcohol-related incidents among Asian airlines recently. Japan Airlines Ltd. managers apologized and took a pay cut after a drunk pilot showed up for duty to fly the London-Tokyo route on Oct. 28 and was found to have consumed excessive alcohol. In November, an Air India pilot scheduled to fly the Delhi-London route tested positive on a breath analyzer test.

Drinking, Punching, Shouting Travelers: IATA’s Unruly List

In December, South Korea’s transport ministry suspended the license of a pilot of budget carrier Jin Air Co. for 90 days for failing an alcohol test before a flight and imposed a 210-million-won ($188,000) penalty on the carrier. In December, a Japan Air cabin attendant was found drunk while on flight and earlier this month an ANA pilot gave wrong information about liquor consumption, the companies said.

--With assistance from Kiyotaka Matsuda.

To contact the reporter on this story: Kyunghee Park in Singapore at kpark3@bloomberg.net

To contact the editors responsible for this story: Anand Krishnamoorthy at anandk@bloomberg.net, Sam Nagarajan

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