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Hong Kong tennis prodigy Cody Wong seals fourth ITF title in six weeks, as women’s quartet eye 2022 Asian Games medal

South China Morning Post logo South China Morning Post 25/11/2021
  • The 19-year-old teams up with local No 1 Eudice Chong to win three doubles finals, before sealing another with Romania's Cadar
  • 'We've had so few opportunities to compete abroad, so to get good results and match experience gives me confidence for the future,' says Wong

Teen prodigy Cody Wong Hong-yi secured her fourth doubles title in six weeks to cap off a glittering ITF World Tennis Tour for Hong Kong's women's contingent in Egypt.

The 19-year-old, who already boasts one ITF singles title from 2019, partnered Romania's Elena-Teodora Cadar to beat China's Bai Zhuoxuan and Punnin Kowapitukted of Thailand 6-2, 6-3 in the doubles final at the weekend.

Wong had already successfully teamed up with reigning Hong Kong women's champion Eudice Chong for the first five weeks in Sharm el-Sheikh, with the pair winning three of four doubles finals.

"I'm so happy to win four doubles titles in Egypt," Wong said, explaining she played alongside Cadar as usual partner Chong had other competition obligations in Italy.

Hong Kong women's tennis player Cody Wong in an ITF World Tennis Tour singles game in Egypt. © Provided by South China Morning Post Hong Kong women's tennis player Cody Wong in an ITF World Tennis Tour singles game in Egypt.

"It was our first time playing together, but I already felt that after one match we had a good understanding.

"The most thrilling match was the last final, because we had four singles matches on the same day. Unfortunately, I twisted my ankle in the fourth and had to decide whether to continue the doubles. In the end, I decided to go for it and was so glad that I did."

"We've had so few opportunities to compete abroad," Wong aded. "So to be able to stay here for six weeks of competition and get good results and match experience gives me confidence for the future. I hope to get even better results and improve my world ranking across the next six weeks."

Hong Kong's Cody Wong (right) with doubles partner Elena-Teodora Cadar after winning the women's doubles final in week six of the ITF World Tennis Tour in Egypt. © Provided by South China Morning Post Hong Kong's Cody Wong (right) with doubles partner Elena-Teodora Cadar after winning the women's doubles final in week six of the ITF World Tennis Tour in Egypt.

In the women's singles events, the 25-year-old Chong came close to silverware having reached one final and semi-final, while Wong and teammate Tiffany Wu Ho-ching each featured in one semi-final.

Rounding outp the quartet, Maggie Ng Man-ying struggled in the singles but managed a doubles quarter-final fixture in week four with Chinese partner Wang Jiaqi.

After six weeks of gruelling duels, team Hong Kong gained valuable experience and court time for their upcoming ITF events in Monastir, Tunisia beginning on Thursday.

"After these legs, I've improved my speed in assessing opponents' strengths and weaknesses and how to combat them tactically. I feel I am more versatile in strategising against new opponents," said the 25-year-old Ng.

"Having reached the semis in Egypt, I hope to show more consistency in the singles and improve the state of my game."

Wu added: "I finally found my rhythm after these six legs. It's been so long since we competed internationally, so I was able to focus on my condition and make technical adjustments over the six weeks."

All four players laid out similar goals for the next year: to gain match experience, significantly improve their world rankings - which in turn help the city's international ranking - and most importantly, set up a runway for a medal at the 2022 Hangzhou Asian Games.

This article originally appeared on the South China Morning Post (www.scmp.com), the leading news media reporting on China and Asia.

Copyright (c) 2021. South China Morning Post Publishers Ltd. All rights reserved.

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