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Wonderwall Logo By Wonderwall.com Editors of Wonderwall | Slide 2 of 10: On Sunday, Jimmy Kimmel will make his way to the Staples Center, presumably dressed in some awards show tux finery, to host the 72nd Annual Primetime Emmy Awards -- with no nominees, no red carpet and no audience. So what can we expect? Even Jimmy, who's also an executive producer on the broadcast, can't be certain, though he's pretty sure the ratings will not be good. "I know everyone will get crazy when I say this, but this will probably be the lowest-rated Emmys of all time," he tells Deadline, citing the high degree of competition that's left fewer people tuning in to network television. "I guess it's going to be some combination of the Emmys and 'Big Brother' because we don't know for sure how it's going to work ...," he explains. "My hope is that [the nominees] are surrounded by their families so that we have genuine emotion and excitement when they win ... because we're certainly not going to have that in the empty Staples Center." As for his own performance, he admits it could go either way. "I don't know, maybe I'm going to screw it up. You know, the thing about it is you only get one shot at it. It's not like a nightly talk show where you do something, and you continually make adjustments," he says. "You kind of have to get it right the first time, but I think the key for me is to forget about the fact that I'm in a giant room and you know, that I'm not going to have to project to the back of the room. That I'm just, in this case, literally talking to people in their homes, and keep it intimate even though we are in this gargantuan venue." The late night host agreed to the Emmys gig before it was clear the coronavirus pandemic would make a regular awards show too dangerous. And despite the potential awkwardness of helming a celebration of stars that's kind of a one-man party -- and the recent trend of hostless awards shows -- Jimmy believes strongly that these ceremonies require hosts. "They started by getting rid of the host," he says with a laugh, "and now we got rid of the audience." The virtual Primetime Emmy Awards air on ABC Sunday, Sept. 20, at 8 p.m. ET and 5 p.m. PT. HBO's "Watchmen" leads the nominations with 26 chances for a statuette.

Emmys host Jimmy Kimmel predicts 'lowest-rated Emmys of all time'

On Sunday, Jimmy Kimmel will make his way to the Staples Center, presumably dressed in some awards show tux finery, to host the 72nd Annual Primetime Emmy Awards -- with no nominees, no red carpet and no audience. So what can we expect? Even Jimmy, who's also an executive producer on the broadcast, can't be certain, though he's pretty sure the ratings will not be good. "I know everyone will get crazy when I say this, but this will probably be the lowest-rated Emmys of all time," he tells Deadline, citing the high degree of competition that's left fewer people tuning in to network television. "I guess it's going to be some combination of the Emmys and 'Big Brother' because we don't know for sure how it's going to work ...," he explains. "My hope is that [the nominees] are surrounded by their families so that we have genuine emotion and excitement when they win ... because we're certainly not going to have that in the empty Staples Center." As for his own performance, he admits it could go either way. "I don't know, maybe I'm going to screw it up. You know, the thing about it is you only get one shot at it. It's not like a nightly talk show where you do something, and you continually make adjustments," he says. "You kind of have to get it right the first time, but I think the key for me is to forget about the fact that I'm in a giant room and you know, that I'm not going to have to project to the back of the room. That I'm just, in this case, literally talking to people in their homes, and keep it intimate even though we are in this gargantuan venue." The late night host agreed to the Emmys gig before it was clear the coronavirus pandemic would make a regular awards show too dangerous. And despite the potential awkwardness of helming a celebration of stars that's kind of a one-man party -- and the recent trend of hostless awards shows -- Jimmy believes strongly that these ceremonies require hosts. "They started by getting rid of the host," he says with a laugh, "and now we got rid of the audience." The virtual Primetime Emmy Awards air on ABC Sunday, Sept. 20, at 8 p.m. ET and 5 p.m. PT. HBO's "Watchmen" leads the nominations with 26 chances for a statuette.

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