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Dining-Out Etiquette Rules That Should Come Back

24/7 Tempo Logo By Colman Andrews of 24/7 Tempo | Slide 2 of 19: If you're the host at a restaurant dinner, don't leave your guests sitting alone and possibly awkwardly at the table. If you're the guest, help the host get things started on time. If you and your dining companion or party arrive together -- on time -- you can reasonably expect to be seated promptly. If you're asked to wait for a few minutes while another party pays the check or a table is reset, though, it's not the end of the world. How long should you wait? That's an individual choice, but 10 or 15 minutes doesn't seem unreasonable (especially if the management buys you a drink); 30 minutes or longer does, unless you've scored a reservation at the hottest place in town and no amount of inconvenience will turn you away.

1. Arrive on time

If you're the host at a restaurant dinner, don't leave your guests sitting alone and possibly awkwardly at the table. If you're the guest, help the host get things started on time. If you and your dining companion or party arrive together -- on time -- you can reasonably expect to be seated promptly. If you're asked to wait for a few minutes while another party pays the check or a table is reset, though, it's not the end of the world. How long should you wait? That's an individual choice, but 10 or 15 minutes doesn't seem unreasonable (especially if the management buys you a drink); 30 minutes or longer does, unless you've scored a reservation at the hottest place in town and no amount of inconvenience will turn you away.

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