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7 'Safe' Places Where You Could Catch Coronavirus

Best Life Logo By Alex Palmer of Best Life | Slide 2 of 8: The Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC) itself reassures swimmers that "there is no evidence that the virus that causes COVID-19 can be spread to people through the water in pools, hot tubs, spas, or water play areas." But while you aren't likely to catch the virus just by taking a dip where someone infected has been swimming—especially if it's well-chlorinated—that does not mean a trip to the local pool is a good idea."Much about swimming at a beach or in a swimming pool makes social distancing difficult," according to twin brothers Jamil Abdurrahman, MD, and Idries Abdurrahman, MD. "And anytime social distancing is not being maintained, there is a risk of transmitting the COVID-19 virus."The Abdurrahmans also point to a 2009 study published in the journal Water Research that found that coronaviruses in general can remain in water for anywhere from a few days to a few weeks. "Now, it is important to note that, just because virus particles are found in water, this doesn't necessarily mean that they will be active and able to cause an active infection," the Abdurrahmans clarify. "But just the fact that a coronavirus may be able to survive in water means that it is at least possible that transmission of the virus could occur from contacting contaminated water." And for more on how the coronavirus works in water, check out Can You Get Coronavirus From a Pool? Experts Weigh In.

1. Swimming pools

The Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC) itself reassures swimmers that "there is no evidence that the virus that causes COVID-19 can be spread to people through the water in pools, hot tubs, spas, or water play areas." But while you aren't likely to catch the virus just by taking a dip where someone infected has been swimming—especially if it's well-chlorinated—that does not mean a trip to the local pool is a good idea.

"Much about swimming at a beach or in a swimming pool makes social distancing difficult," according to twin brothers Jamil Abdurrahman, MD, and Idries Abdurrahman, MD. "And anytime social distancing is not being maintained, there is a risk of transmitting the COVID-19 virus."

The Abdurrahmans also point to a 2009 study published in the journal Water Research that found that coronaviruses in general can remain in water for anywhere from a few days to a few weeks. "Now, it is important to note that, just because virus particles are found in water, this doesn't necessarily mean that they will be active and able to cause an active infection," the Abdurrahmans clarify. "But just the fact that a coronavirus may be able to survive in water means that it is at least possible that transmission of the virus could occur from contacting contaminated water." And for more on how the coronavirus works in water, check out Can You Get Coronavirus From a Pool? Experts Weigh In.

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