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Best towing: every truck ranked

Motoring Research Logo By John Moroney of Motoring Research | Slide 1 of 26: Back when horsepower was relatable to biological farm equipment, truck size was measured on how much it could carry: half-ton, three-quarter-ton, one-ton, and so on. Over time, manufacturers began to name their trucks according to these designations. For example, Ford used F-150 for their half-ton model, F-250 for three-quarter-ton, and F-350 for one ton. Chevrolet had the C/K 10, 20 and 30. Dodge called theirs the D-100. D-200, and D-300. Now, of course, trucks are so capable that payload should probably be measured in boatloads rather than tons. The naming conventions still exist, though, and provide a general notion of what a truck can do. What creates good towing capacity? Power helps of course, especially in torque form. Heavy axles are needed to carry the load, and higher numerical axle ratios maximize pulling power. Truck weight matters; the less of itself it has to tote around, the more power can be applied to the load behind. Truck suspension is usually beefy to begin with, but extra-heavy loads require special design consideration. The transmission should be able to transmit the power to the load and not overheat under the strain. Luckily, all of this has been thought out by the engineers, and the bigger truck sizes come with the bigger equipment already in place. To rank towing capacity, we’ve broken up the trucks on sale in the U.S. into mid-size (the smallest size available), full-size, heavy-duty, and ultra-duty. We’ve added whatever towing packages and accessories are available, and installed the engine and transmission that provide the most grunt. (Prices as specified will vary slightly by market and should be used as a guide rather than gospel) Follow MSN Autos on Facebook & Twitter

America's best trucks for towing, ranked

Back when horsepower was relatable to biological farm equipment, truck size was measured on how much it could carry: half-ton, three-quarter-ton, one-ton, and so on. Over time, manufacturers began to name their trucks according to these designations. For example, Ford used F-150 for their half-ton model, F-250 for three-quarter-ton, and F-350 for one ton. Chevrolet had the C/K 10, 20 and 30. Dodge called theirs the D-100. D-200, and D-300.

Now, of course, trucks are so capable that payload should probably be measured in boatloads rather than tons. The naming conventions still exist, though, and provide a general notion of what a truck can do.

What creates good towing capacity? Power helps of course, especially in torque form. Heavy axles are needed to carry the load, and higher numerical axle ratios maximize pulling power. Truck weight matters; the less of itself it has to tote around, the more power can be applied to the load behind. Truck suspension is usually beefy to begin with, but extra-heavy loads require special design consideration. The transmission should be able to transmit the power to the load and not overheat under the strain. Luckily, all of this has been thought out by the engineers, and the bigger truck sizes come with the bigger equipment already in place.

To rank towing capacity, we’ve broken up the trucks on sale in the U.S. into mid-size (the smallest size available), full-size, heavy-duty, and ultra-duty. We’ve added whatever towing packages and accessories are available, and installed the engine and transmission that provide the most grunt.

(Prices as specified will vary slightly by market and should be used as a guide rather than gospel)

Follow MSN Autos on Facebook & Twitter

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