You are using an older browser version. Please use a supported version for the best MSN experience.

The Chrysler Museum in Pictures: Gone But Not Forgotten

Car and Driver Logo By Ron Sessions of Car and Driver | Slide 2 of 21: A decade before the Chrysler Corporation existed, John and Horace Dodge switched their big Hamtramck, Michigan, factory from supplying major components to Ford Motor Company to manufacturing their first car, the Dodge Brothers 30-35 Touring Car, in late 1914. A step up from Ford’s Model T, the five-passenger sedan offered a steel body, electrical start, lights, and a 12-volt electric system—features almost unheard of in low-priced cars at the time. It also had a longer wheelbase than the Model T and more power, courtesy of a 35-hp 212-cubic-inch L-head inline-four. On the strength of this sturdy model, Dodge became the third-best-selling brand in the U.S. in 1915—behind Ford and Willys-Overland. Subsequently, during an incursion into Mexican territory following a raid of a border town in New Mexico that resulted in the deaths of American citizens, General John Pershing and then-lieutenant George Patton used Dodge Touring Cars in the pursuit of Pancho Villa and his band of Villistas.

1915 Dodge Brothers 30-35 Touring Car

A decade before the Chrysler Corporation existed, John and Horace Dodge switched their big Hamtramck, Michigan, factory from supplying major components to Ford Motor Company to manufacturing their first car, the Dodge Brothers 30-35 Touring Car, in late 1914. A step up from Ford’s Model T, the five-passenger sedan offered a steel body, electrical start, lights, and a 12-volt electric system—features almost unheard of in low-priced cars at the time. It also had a longer wheelbase than the Model T and more power, courtesy of a 35-hp 212-cubic-inch L-head inline-four. On the strength of this sturdy model, Dodge became the fourth-best-selling brand in the U.S. in 1915—behind Ford, Willys-Overland, and Buick. Subsequently, during an incursion into Mexican territory following a raid of a border town in New Mexico that resulted in the deaths of American citizens, General John Pershing and then-lieutenant George Patton used Dodge Touring Cars in the pursuit of Pancho Villa and his band of Villistas.
© Ron Sessions

More From Car and Driver

Car and Driver
Car and Driver
Loading...

image beaconimage beaconimage beacon