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The Cars the Government Shutdown Might Delay

Motor Trend Logo By Motor Trend Staff of Motor Trend | Slide 1 of 10: As President Trump and Congress feud over the government shutdown, regulatory agencies that test and approve vehicles for sale in the U.S. remain closed. That could impact the launch dates for several much-anticipated vehicles slated for launch in the next several months.This buzz-kill is in contrast to the public reaction to acres of shiny new vehicles unveiled at media days for the North American International Auto Show in Detroit. What's more, automakers are gearing up for next month's Chicago show that bills itself as the largest consumer show in America.Before a new (or significantly re-engineered) car can go on sale, it must be certified by the federal government. Under the Clean Air Act it is the responsibility of the Environmental Protection Agency. The National Vehicle and Fuel Emissions Laboratory in Ann Arbor does the verification. But the lab is among the agencies not being funded during the month-long shutdown.On the bright side, many new vehicles are not slated to go on sale until spring, and the majority are fall launches. While automakers are concerned if the shutdown goes too long, in most cases there is still time before panic sets in.Concern is a bit higher for diesel-powered vehicles. The emissions reporting scandal is still fresh in American minds, and many automakers have canceled or whittled down their plans to offer diesel-fuelled vehicles in the U.S.—the exception being large pickups that are huge profit-makers for Detroit. Some diesel-powered vehicles have faced long wait times for certification as federal agencies have been more meticulous in the wake of the cheating scandal.Keep reading to find out where the new vehicle launches stand at nine automotive brands.

GOVERNMENT SHUTDOWN CARS

As President Trump and Congress feud over the government shutdown, regulatory agencies that test and approve vehicles for sale in the U.S. remain closed. That could impact the launch dates for several much-anticipated vehicles slated for launch in the next several months.

This buzz-kill is in contrast to the public reaction to acres of shiny new vehicles unveiled at media days for the North American International Auto Show in Detroit. What's more, automakers are gearing up for next month's Chicago show that bills itself as the largest consumer show in America.

Before a new (or significantly re-engineered) car can go on sale, it must be certified by the federal government. Under the Clean Air Act it is the responsibility of the Environmental Protection Agency. The National Vehicle and Fuel Emissions Laboratory in Ann Arbor does the verification. But the lab is among the agencies not being funded during the month-long shutdown.

On the bright side, many new vehicles are not slated to go on sale until spring, and the majority are fall launches. While automakers are concerned if the shutdown goes too long, in most cases there is still time before panic sets in.

Concern is a bit higher for diesel-powered vehicles. The emissions reporting scandal is still fresh in American minds, and many automakers have canceled or whittled down their plans to offer diesel-fuelled vehicles in the U.S.—the exception being large pickups that are huge profit-makers for Detroit. Some diesel-powered vehicles have faced long wait times for certification as federal agencies have been more meticulous in the wake of the cheating scandal.

Keep reading to find out where the new vehicle launches stand at nine automotive brands.

© Motor Trend Staff

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