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Aston Martin Considering U.S., Other Locations for DBX Production

Motor Trend logo Motor Trend 4/23/2015 Jason Udy

Aston Martin is considering building the production version of the DBX concept car in the U.S., the Financial Times reports. If the company decides to go that route, it would be the British automaker’s first plant outside of its home country.

While Aston Martin has reportedly been in talks with several southern states, the automaker is also considering sites closer to home including the former Jaguar plant at Browns Lane in Coventry. The southern U.S. states, however, are said to be aggressively courting the British automaker with incentives such as land and tax breaks.

“As part of the feasibility study to bring DBX to production which is now ongoing, amongst other things we must consider where is feasible to build the car but nothing is decided in that respect,” an Aston Martin representative told Motor Trend in an email.

Although current Aston Martin sales are right around 4,000 units per year, the automaker hopes to bring that count back up to 7,000 units. That number is in addition to the 3,000 units for a new luxury sedan Aston plans to sell. Adding production of that new model at the Gaydon plant would necessitate a new facility to build the production version of the Aston Martin DBX shown at the Geneva auto show earlier this year.

The Aston Martin DBX concept would be a new kind of model for the premium automaker. The concept featured a raised off-road stance similar to the Local Motors Rally Fighter or a Subaru Outback wagon with a coupe body. Styling is an evolution of the Aston Martin DB10 coupe from the upcoming James Bond "Spectre" flick. Power comes from an all-electric drivetrain with inboard electric motors in all four wheels. Electrical current is stored by lithium-sulfur cells. Aston Martin hopes the new vehicle could lure a new type of buyer into showrooms.

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With current models built primarily by hand, a new plant would also allow the automaker to use more robotics in production for the future model.

Source: Financial Times

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