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Repairing National Corvette Museum Sinkhole to Cost $3.2 Million

Motor Trend logo Motor Trend 10/17/2014 Jake Holmes

Officials at the National Corvette Museum in Bowling Green, Kentucky, say it will cost $3.2 million to fill in the sinkhole that opened beneath the museum's Skydome area in February. Work on the repairs will start November 10 and will take approximately nine months to complete.


Eight Chevrolet Corvette models on display at the museum fell into the sinkhole in February, and were painstakingly removed by a construction team. General Motors plans to restore three of the damaged cars, while others will be left on display as they emerged from the sinkhole. Although the National Corvette Museum initially planned to leave the gaping sinkhole untouched -- it's proven so popular that tourist visits to the museum increased significantly this year -- doing so would have been more expensive than simply filling and repairing the hole.

Corvette Sinkhole© Provided by MotorTrend Corvette Sinkhole

Work will begin November 10 and is scheduled to be completed by July 2015. Construction crews will remove boulders from the hole, before filling it with 4000 tons of stone, installing support beams and trusses, rebuilding entrance doors and other infrastructure improvements, and finally installing a new floor. The museum will have a webcam feed on its website showing the progress of the reconstruction effort, and plans to create some sort of sinkhole permanent exhibit about the event next year.

"We appreciate all of the support, feedback, ideas and prayers throughout this very interesting time in our history," National Corvette Museum executive director Wendell Strode said in a statement. “Sunday, November 9 will be the very last day to see the sinkhole up close and in person – so if you’ve been wanting to check it out for yourself you have just over three weeks to do so.”

Source: National Corvette Museum

Photos courtesy National Corvette Museum.


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