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Dog the Bounty Hunter says he's lost 17 pounds since Beth Chapman's death, plus more news

Wonderwall Logo By Wonderwall.com Editors of Wonderwall | Slide 1 of 10: For Duane "Dog" Chapman, life is still in limbo. The "Dog's Most Wanted" star said goodbye to his wife, Beth Chapman, on June 26, when she lost her long fight with cancer at age 51. Since then, he's had trouble sleeping and eating, though he takes solace in knowing others grieving the death of a loved one feel a little less alone because he's able to share his story. "I haven't gotten past the place where I'm [not] putting a pillow where she was and covering it up. And then I wake up in the middle of the night and I see her and it doesn't register that [it] ain't her. I'm still there," he recently told ET during an interview at his home. "I wake up to always touch her, especially when she was sick I'd have to wake up a few times when she stopped breathing. I couldn't hear it no more. And she's laying and I'm like, 'You are not dying like that. I will not let you die.' So I'm so used to that that I don't sleep solid anymore." He's not eating much, either. In fact, he's been losing weight rapidly, in part because he has no appetite but also because she always helped him order when they ate out. "I can't eat. Two bites, I'm full. I got to force feed myself like I force fed her," he said. At restaurants, he was used to Beth reading the menu for him once his eyes grew weak. "I would go, 'What do I want today, honey?' and she would name two things," he recalled. "I never ordered …I'm having a hard time ordering food. I've lost 17 pounds. Chewing ice helps, and I've lost 17 pounds in about two weeks." On a happier note, Dog said he now has "a whole new look on life," and sounds like he's feeling more at peace with his own mortality. "People would say I lived a long and great life, sometimes a hard life," he explained, adding that he thinks sometimes he's "ready to join" Beth. He's also staying positive about the fact that his platform can be a way to relate to people who are suffering for the same reason he is. "I went through experiences to help others -- I really mean this. The other day I met [a guy]. He goes, 'Dog, you know I love you. I'm sorry, I lost my wife six months ago,' and I hugged him and I felt a connection like, boom, instantly brotherhood, right," he recalled. "So when you go through something and somebody else [goes through the same thing], there's something there. That's why I'm going through it, but I use that thing that's bad to help me help others."

Duane 'Dog' Chapman still can't eat or sleep weeks after Beth Chapman's death

For Duane "Dog" Chapman, life is still in limbo. The "Dog's Most Wanted" star said goodbye to his wife, Beth Chapman, on June 26, when she lost her long fight with cancer at age 51. Since then, he's had trouble sleeping and eating, though he takes solace in knowing others grieving the death of a loved one feel a little less alone because he's able to share his story. "I haven't gotten past the place where I'm [not] putting a pillow where she was and covering it up. And then I wake up in the middle of the night and I see her and it doesn't register that [it] ain't her. I'm still there," he recently told ET during an interview at his home. "I wake up to always touch her, especially when she was sick I'd have to wake up a few times when she stopped breathing. I couldn't hear it no more. And she's laying and I'm like, 'You are not dying like that. I will not let you die.' So I'm so used to that that I don't sleep solid anymore." He's not eating much, either. In fact, he's been losing weight rapidly, in part because he has no appetite but also because she always helped him order when they ate out. "I can't eat. Two bites, I'm full. I got to force feed myself like I force fed her," he said. At restaurants, he was used to Beth reading the menu for him once his eyes grew weak. "I would go, 'What do I want today, honey?' and she would name two things," he recalled. "I never ordered …I'm having a hard time ordering food. I've lost 17 pounds. Chewing ice helps, and I've lost 17 pounds in about two weeks." On a happier note, Dog said he now has "a whole new look on life," and sounds like he's feeling more at peace with his own mortality. "People would say I lived a long and great life, sometimes a hard life," he explained, adding that he thinks sometimes he's "ready to join" Beth. He's also staying positive about the fact that his platform can be a way to relate to people who are suffering for the same reason he is. "I went through experiences to help others -- I really mean this. The other day I met [a guy]. He goes, 'Dog, you know I love you. I'm sorry, I lost my wife six months ago,' and I hugged him and I felt a connection like, boom, instantly brotherhood, right," he recalled. "So when you go through something and somebody else [goes through the same thing], there's something there. That's why I'm going through it, but I use that thing that's bad to help me help others."

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