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Brad Pitt talks 'low-grade depression' battle, retirement plans, plus more news

Wonderwall Logo By Wonderwall.com Editors of Wonderwall | Slide 1 of 7: At 58 -- and with six years of sobriety under his belt -- Brad Pitt says he's getting to know a relatively new feeling: joy. In a new interview for GQ's August 2022 issue, the "Bullet Train" star opens up about the "low-grade depression" he says he's probably battled for years. "I always felt very alone in my life, alone growing up as a kid, alone even out here, and it's really not till recently that I have had a greater embrace of my friends and family," he says. "What's that line, it was either Rilke or Einstein, believe it or not, but it was something about when you can walk with the paradox, when you carry real pain and real joy simultaneously, this is maturity, this is growth." As the interview continues, the actor and father of six cites music as something that "fills [him] with joy," before reflecting on his relationship with that feeling. "I think joy's been a newer discovery, later in life," he says. "I was always moving with the currents, drifting in a way, and onto the next. I think I spent years with a low-grade depression, and it's not until coming to terms with that, trying to embrace all sides of self -- the beauty and the ugly -- that I've been able to catch those moments of joy." He's also coming to terms with his eventual retirement from acting. "I consider myself on my last leg ... this last semester or trimester," he says. "What is this section gonna be? And how do I wanna design that?"

Brad Pitt reveals 'low-grade depression' battle, retirement plans

At 58 -- and with six years of sobriety under his belt -- Brad Pitt says he's getting to know a relatively new feeling: joy. In a new interview for GQ's August 2022 issue, the "Bullet Train" star opens up about the "low-grade depression" he says he's probably battled for years. "I always felt very alone in my life, alone growing up as a kid, alone even out here, and it's really not till recently that I have had a greater embrace of my friends and family," he says. "What's that line, it was either Rilke or Einstein, believe it or not, but it was something about when you can walk with the paradox, when you carry real pain and real joy simultaneously, this is maturity, this is growth." As the interview continues, the actor and father of six cites music as something that "fills [him] with joy," before reflecting on his relationship with that feeling. "I think joy's been a newer discovery, later in life," he says. "I was always moving with the currents, drifting in a way, and onto the next. I think I spent years with a low-grade depression, and it's not until coming to terms with that, trying to embrace all sides of self -- the beauty and the ugly -- that I've been able to catch those moments of joy." He's also coming to terms with his eventual retirement from acting. "I consider myself on my last leg ... this last semester or trimester," he says. "What is this section gonna be? And how do I wanna design that?"

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