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Peter Hooton shocked by police cover-up in Hillsborough disaster

6/12/2014

The Farm frontman Peter Hooton has called for a fresh inquest into Britain's worst ever sporting disaster after a damning report, released on Wednesday (12Sep12), suggested police officials tried to cover up mistakes made during the 1989 Hillsborough stadium tragedy. Previously unseen files have revealed cops made "strenuous attempts" to deflect blame onto victims in the aftermath of the horrific crush at the Sheffield, England soccer ground, which claimed the lives of 96 fans. The authors of the new report found that "failure in police control" was the main cause of the tragedy, and suggested "multiple failures" in other emergency services also contributed to the death toll. Hooton, a Liverpool superfan who was at the fateful FA Cup match cheering on his team, has long campaigned for justice for those smeared in police reports, but admits even he was stunned by what he read in the official report. He tells BBC current affairs show Newsnight, "The report is so damning. I think even people who thought they knew the truth about Hillsborough were even shocked by the scale of the revelations... We couldn't believe the actual extent of the cover-up and the collusion and the lies at the top level... "Liverpool fans have always known the truth from 1989... Thank God the world knows the truth now. It's been a long, hard campaign and we've had a lot of support from a lot of people from all around the world, especially from the people of Liverpool... The city has come together over this. But it's not just Liverpool... It's not a football tragedy... This is a human tragedy." Now Hooton has appealed for a new probe after the Hillsborough Independent Panel officials found the original to be lacking. He adds, "Let's hope it is the start of a proper investigation." Dominic Grieve, the Attorney General for England and Wales, has confirmed reports he will review the evidence and consider whether or not to overturn the original inquest's verdict of accidental death after the Hillsborough Independent Panel concluded that up to 41 of the 96 who perished may have been saved if police and emergency service errors had not occurred.

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