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The Most Iconic Desserts Across the U.S.

Eat This, Not That! Logo By Jessica Farthing of Eat This, Not That! | Slide 2 of 43: No cookie is more American than a chocolate chip cookie. With very little variety, this recipe has remained basically the same since the 1930s. The chocolate chip cookie’s origin is a little unclear; some believe a baker came up with the recipe by accident, while others dispute that claim. But one thing is certain: You have Ruth Wakefield to thank for the simple, delicious treat.Wakefield and her husband, Kenneth, ran a Massachusetts restaurant called the Toll House Inn, The New York Times reported. As legend has it, while making a batch of cookies for her guests one day, Wakefield found that she had used up all of her baker’s chocolate. A quick substitution was made with some Nestlé’s semi-sweet chocolate that she had on hand in her kitchen. She expected it to mix into the dough, but instead, it stayed suspended in the sweet batter.After locals and guests sampled the “Toll House Chocolate Crunch Cookie,” it grew in reputation. Her recipe was published in a Boston newspaper, and Nestlé’s chocolate morsels began to sell in record amounts. In return for a lifetime of free chocolate, the Nestlé company was allowed to print the Toll House Cookie recipe on its package.

1. Chocolate Chip Cookies

No cookie is more American than a chocolate chip cookie. With very little variety, this recipe has remained basically the same since the 1930s. The chocolate chip cookie’s origin is a little unclear; some believe a baker came up with the recipe by accident, while others dispute that claim. But one thing is certain: You have Ruth Wakefield to thank for the simple, delicious treat.

Wakefield and her husband, Kenneth, ran a Massachusetts restaurant called the Toll House Inn, The New York Times reported. As legend has it, while making a batch of cookies for her guests one day, Wakefield found that she had used up all of her baker’s chocolate. A quick substitution was made with some Nestlé’s semi-sweet chocolate that she had on hand in her kitchen. She expected it to mix into the dough, but instead, it stayed suspended in the sweet batter.

After locals and guests sampled the “Toll House Chocolate Crunch Cookie,” it grew in reputation. Her recipe was published in a Boston newspaper, and Nestlé’s chocolate morsels began to sell in record amounts. In return for a lifetime of free chocolate, the Nestlé company was allowed to print the Toll House Cookie recipe on its package.

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