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The Fake Melania Conspiracy Theory is Back

Back in 2005, a newly-wedded Melania Trump summed up her marriage in a depressing quip. Speaking to a class at New York University, she fielded a question from a student who asked if she would be with her husband if he weren’t rich. “If I weren’t beautiful,” she replied, “do you think he’d be with me?” As Donald Trump stepped onto the world stage with his successful presidential campaign, so did his marriage. The Trumps have never seemed like a happy couple—he allegedly cheated on her with Stormy Daniels just months after their son Barron was born, and was reportedly infuriated—understandably—when news of her husband’s payoffs to former flames broke. She allegedly never wanted Donald to be president, and she and Barron stayed in New York City for the first five months of Trump’s term. Since joining him at the White House they’ve become the first presidential pair since the Nixons to sleep in separate bedrooms. Then there’s all the video evidence—the forced-seeming smile at his inauguration, her visible reluctance to hold his hand. When asked in an interview if she loves Donald, she responded, “Yes, we are fine.” The mountain of evidence suggesting that Trump and Melania are anything but a besotted love match, combined with the First Lady’s penchant for taciturnity and fondness for sunglasses, has festered into one of the Internet’s stranger conspiracy theories: Fake Melania.

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