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9 Science-Backed Strategies to Help Reverse Diabetes

Reader's Digest Logo By Alyssa Jung of Reader's Digest | Slide 1 of 9: <p>'I always tell patients that the most important change they can make is getting more exercise,' says Betul Hatipoglu, MD, a Cleveland Clinic endocrinologist. The University of Alabama at Birmingham recruited more than 5,000 overweight adults with <a href="http://www.rd.com/diabetes/">type 2 diabetes</a> and assigned them to either an intensive <a href="http://www.rd.com/health/diet-weight-loss/how-to-lose-weight/">weight-loss</a> program or an education and support intervention. After one year, 11.5 percent of those in the intensive group (who reduced their intake to between 1,200 and 1,800 calories a day and increased activity levels to 175 minutes per week) experienced diabetes remission, compared to just 2 percent in the support and education group.</p>The American College of Sports Medicine and the American Diabetes Association released a report in a 2010 issue of Diabetes Care that analyzed multiple studies on the effect of <a href="http://www.rd.com/health/conditions/diabetes-and-exercise/">exercise on type 2 diabetes</a> management and concluded that regular exercise helps control insulin resistance and blood glucose levels.

First, start exercising

With simple diet and lifestyle changes, some people can drop their blood sugar levels back to a normal range.

'I always tell patients that the most important change they can make is getting more exercise,' says Betul Hatipoglu, MD, a Cleveland Clinic endocrinologist. The University of Alabama at Birmingham recruited more than 5,000 overweight adults with type 2 diabetes and assigned them to either an intensive weight-loss program or an education and support intervention. After one year, 11.5 percent of those in the intensive group (who reduced their intake to between 1,200 and 1,800 calories a day and increased activity levels to 175 minutes per week) experienced diabetes remission, compared to just 2 percent in the support and education group.

The American College of Sports Medicine and the American Diabetes Association released a report in a 2010 issue of Diabetes Care that analyzed multiple studies on the effect of exercise on type 2 diabetes management and concluded that regular exercise helps control insulin resistance and blood glucose levels.
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