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7 Ways Your Sneakers Are Ruining Your Workout Routine

Reader's Digest Logo By Carina Wolff of Reader's Digest | Slide 1 of 7: You might love your favorite pair of running shoes, but if you've had them for years, it's time to throw them out. 'If your sneakers are old and worn out, they could be shifting your weight abnormally, which can lead to injuries not only to your feet, but also to your entire skeleton,' says podiatrist <a href="http://www.vionicshoes.com/vionic-innovation-lab/dr-jackie-sutera">Jacqueline Sutera, DPM</a>, a Vionic Innovation Lab member. Conventional wisdom says to change up your sneakers every 300 to 500 miles, but there are visual clues of wear and tear that you may notice well before that. Place your sneakers on a table top and look at them at eye level, making sure to also flip them upside down and examine the soles. If a portion of the outside soles is smooth, uneven, and worn, you're ready for a new pair. Here are the most common <a href="http://www.rd.com/health/conditions/common-foot-problems/1">foot problems</a> and podiatrists' solutions.

They're tired

To see the best results and prevent injury, watch for these red flags that your footwear is not worthy of your workout.

You might love your favorite pair of running shoes, but if you've had them for years, it's time to throw them out. 'If your sneakers are old and worn out, they could be shifting your weight abnormally, which can lead to injuries not only to your feet, but also to your entire skeleton,' says podiatrist Jacqueline Sutera, DPM, a Vionic Innovation Lab member. Conventional wisdom says to change up your sneakers every 300 to 500 miles, but there are visual clues of wear and tear that you may notice well before that. Place your sneakers on a table top and look at them at eye level, making sure to also flip them upside down and examine the soles. If a portion of the outside soles is smooth, uneven, and worn, you're ready for a new pair. Here are the most common foot problems and podiatrists' solutions.
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