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15 Ways Your Home Could Be Giving You Cancer

The Remedy Logo By Karina Margit Erdelyi of The Remedy | Slide 2 of 16: The headlines made national news just this week: Nitrate pollution in U.S. drinking water may be the cause of 12,594 cases of cancer, according to a peer-reviewed, “first of its kind national analysis” by the non-profit Environmental Working Group and researchers from Northeastern University.So what are nitrates anyway? They’re a naturally forming compound created when nitrogen combines with oxygen or ozone. Nitrogen is vital for all living things—and in the form of nitrate, nitrite, or ammonium, is key for plant growth. Many fertilizers use nitrogen as a key growth ingredient. But high levels of nitrates can be dangerous to health, particularly for pregnant women and babies according to the Environmental Protection Agency. Nitrates can make their way into drinking water via runoff from fertilized soil, water treatment plants, industrial pollution, malfunctions in septic or sewage tanks, or via the erosion of natural deposits.The Remedy Rx: If you suspect that nitrates may be in your drinking water, you can get it tested. Contact your state’s certification officer for a list of labs in your area that can perform a test on your drinking water. Well water is at particular risk. If your drinking water comes from a well, have it tested regularly, at least once a year, after installing a treatment system to make sure the problem is controlled.

1. Tap Water

The headlines made national news just this week: Nitrate pollution in U.S. drinking water may be the cause of 12,594 cases of cancer, according to a peer-reviewed, “first of its kind national analysis” by the non-profit Environmental Working Group and researchers from Northeastern University.

So what are nitrates anyway? They’re a naturally forming compound created when nitrogen combines with oxygen or ozone. Nitrogen is vital for all living things—and in the form of nitrate, nitrite, or ammonium, is key for plant growth. Many fertilizers use nitrogen as a key growth ingredient. But high levels of nitrates can be dangerous to health, particularly for pregnant women and babies according to the Environmental Protection Agency. Nitrates can make their way into drinking water via runoff from fertilized soil, water treatment plants, industrial pollution, malfunctions in septic or sewage tanks, or via the erosion of natural deposits.

The Remedy Rx: If you suspect that nitrates may be in your drinking water, you can get it tested. Contact your state’s certification officer for a list of labs in your area that can perform a test on your drinking water. Well water is at particular risk. If your drinking water comes from a well, have it tested regularly, at least once a year, after installing a treatment system to make sure the problem is controlled.

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