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New review identifies four key risk factors associated with C-section infections

Relaxnews (AFP) logoRelaxnews (AFP) 6/14/2018

a person lying on a bed: New research has identified some of the key factors that increase the risk of developing an infection during a cesarean section. © Provided by AFPRelaxNews New research has identified some of the key factors that increase the risk of developing an infection during a cesarean section. New US research has identified some of the key factors that increase the risk of developing an infection during a cesarean section, including a history of smoking, drug use, and being obese.

Carried out by the infection prevention team at University of Florida Health Jacksonville, the review looked at 90 cesarean section (C-section) deliveries which included 30 cases of women who developed infections and 60 cases of women who did not.

The team identified four pre-delivery risk factors for developing a C-section infection, including having a prior C-section, smoking, illicit drug use, and being obese.

Women who developed a C-section infection were 25.3 more likely to have previously used illicit drugs, and 8.41 times more likely to have had a prior C-section.

They were also 3.8 times more likely to have smoked.

They were also more likely to have had a higher body-mass index (BMI), with the average BMI for women who developed an infection found to be 42.4, compared to an average BMI of 36.9 in the group of women who did not develop an infection

The study authors, Stefanie Buchanan, RN, BSN, CIC, and Marko Predic, MS, commented on the findings saying the results suggest more patient education was needed following a C-section.

"We found that women leave the hospital with a breadth of information on caring for a newborn and often overlook the education provided on caring for their wound," said Buchanan.

The infection prevention team at University of Florida Health Jacksonville have since updated their standard of care for women pre- and post- C-section following the study.

The new research was presented at the 45th Annual Conference of the Association for Professionals in Infection Control and Epidemiology (APIC) taking place June 13- 15 in Minneapolis.

The results can also be found published online in the American Journal of Infection Control.

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