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Places Where the Most Young Kids Are Doing Drugs

Graphiq Logo By Tessa Boyce of Graphiq | Slide 1 of 52: <p>Adolescent children in middle and high school have a lot on their minds — school, friends, raging hormones and changing bodies — to name a few. Many teens are thinking about college and juggling a part-time job or team sport. Amidst all this chaos, teenagers are also introduced to illegal drugs during this transformative time in their lives. </p><p>Fortunately, drug use among teens is <a href="http://www.usatoday.com/story/news/nation/2016/12/13/teens-drinking-smoking-drugs-study/95349684/">on the decline</a>. According to the <a href="http://www.monitoringthefuture.org//pressreleases/16drugpr_complete.pdf">Monitoring the Future</a> survey of 2016, "teenagers' use of drugs, alcohol and tobacco declined significantly in 2016 at rates that are their lowest since the 1990s." While many adults in the U.S. are struggling with a serious <a href="https://www.nytimes.com/2017/01/06/us/opioid-crisis-epidemic.html">opioid addition</a>, Vicodin use among high-school seniors dropped from 10 percent a decade ago to just <a href="http://www.usatoday.com/story/news/nation/2016/12/13/teens-drinking-smoking-drugs-study/95349684/">2.9 percent</a> in 2016.</p><p>Where are teens staying away from drugs, and which states have a more serious problem with teenage drug use? Using data from the 2014 <a href="https://www.samhsa.gov/data/population-data-nsduh/">Substance Abuse and Mental Health Administration</a> National Survey on Drug Use and Health, <a href="http://www.healthgrove.com/">HealthGrove</a>, a health data site by <a href="http://www.graphiq.com/">Graphiq</a>, ranked all 50 states (and the District of Columbia) by the percentage of adolescents (12-17-year-olds) and young adults (18-25-year-olds) that have used an illicit drug in the past year. Data is from the 2014 survey, and states are ranked from the lowest to highest rates of illicit drug use among 12-17-year-olds.</p><p>Colorado and Washington, the first states to legalize marijuana, have higher rates of illicit drug use. Northeastern states including Vermont, Rhode Island and New Hampshire are on the high end as well. States with the lowest reported illicit drug use are sparsely populated states like South Dakota and North Dakota. </p><p>*Note: "Illicit drugs" in the SAMHA include: Marijuana, cocaine, crack, heroin, hallucinogens, LSD, PCP, ecstasy, inhalants, methamphetamine, misuse of psychotherapeutics, pain relievers, tranquilizers, stimulants and sedatives.<br></p>

Places Where the Most Young Kids Are Doing Drugs

Adolescent children in middle and high school have a lot on their minds — school, friends, raging hormones and changing bodies — to name a few. Many teens are thinking about college and juggling a part-time job or team sport. Amidst all this chaos, teenagers are also introduced to illegal drugs during this transformative time in their lives.

Fortunately, drug use among teens is on the decline. According to the Monitoring the Future survey of 2016, "teenagers' use of drugs, alcohol and tobacco declined significantly in 2016 at rates that are their lowest since the 1990s." While many adults in the U.S. are struggling with a serious opioid addition, Vicodin use among high-school seniors dropped from 10 percent a decade ago to just 2.9 percent in 2016.

Where are teens staying away from drugs, and which states have a more serious problem with teenage drug use? Using data from the 2015 Substance Abuse and Mental Health Administration National Survey on Drug Use and Health, HealthGrove, a health data site by Graphiq, ranked all 50 states (and the District of Columbia) by the percentage of adolescents (12-17-year-olds) and young adults (18-25-year-olds) that have used an illicit drug in the past year. Data is from the 2015 survey, and states are ranked from the lowest to highest rates of illicit drug use among 12-17-year-olds.

Colorado and Washington, the first states to legalize marijuana, have higher rates of illicit drug use. Northeastern states including Vermont, Rhode Island and New Hampshire are on the high end as well. States with the lowest reported illicit drug use are sparsely populated states like South Dakota and North Dakota.

*Note: "Illicit drugs" in the SAMHA include: Marijuana, cocaine, crack, heroin, hallucinogens, LSD, PCP, ecstasy, inhalants, methamphetamine, misuse of psychotherapeutics, pain relievers, tranquilizers, stimulants and sedatives.

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