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The One Thing You Can Stop Doing to Avoid COVID, CDC Says

Best Life Logo By Lauren Gray of Best Life | Slide 1 of 5: At the start of the COVID pandemic, we were all panicking about how to protect ourselves to stay safe from the virus. But as time has gone on, we've learned that some safety measures are more effective than others. In fact, there's one popular precaution that experts now say is not only unnecessary for containing COVID, but may actually spread the virus. According to the Centers for Disease Control (CDC), the once-ubiquitous practice of wearing disposable gloves while running errands is not only ineffective, but also potentially dangerous.According to the health authority, wearing gloves in everyday public settings "will not necessarily protect you from getting COVID-19 and may still lead to the spread of germs." They posit that gloves are "not necessary in most situations," citing the examples of pushing a shopping cart at the grocery store or using an ATM at the bank.David Cutler, MD, a family medicine physician at Providence Saint John's Health Center in Santa Monica, California, agrees with the CDC's recommendation, and notes that the practice of wearing gloves in non-medical settings has always been "unsupported by science.""While the SARS-CoV-2 virus which causes COVID can live on surfaces for many hours and maybe days, the likelihood of acquiring infection from those surfaces is very low," Cutler explains. "Most cases of COVID are transmitted by airborne droplets. Avoiding those droplets by wearing masks and distancing has proven to be very effective."Experts also say that wearing gloves creates a false sense of security that can even increase your chances of accidentally contracting or transmitting COVID. "If you wear gloves in situations that do not have an obvious start and stopping point, you forget that your gloves are contaminated," Leann Poston, MD, medical expert for Ikon Health, previously told Best Life. "People put on gloves, go shopping, use their cell phones, touch their faces, enter their cars and homes, and then remove their gloves. Their hands were covered, but they cross-contaminated everything they touched. It is easier to forget about cross-contamination when wearing gloves. You are much more aware of what you touch when your hands are bare."If you do choose to use disposable gloves for special circumstances, your handling of them is key. After use, be sure to remove them carefully and throw them away in a lined trash can. The CDC says you should never attempt to disinfect or reuse gloves, and you should wash your hands immediately and thoroughly after use.Wondering when you should be wearing gloves for safety? Read on for the only exceptions to the rule, and for more on COVID precautions that aren't working, check out The CDC Warns Against Using These 6 Face Masks.Read the original article on Best Life.

The One Thing You Can Stop Doing to Avoid COVID, CDC Says

At the start of the COVID pandemic, we were all panicking about how to protect ourselves to stay safe from the virus. But as time has gone on, we've learned that some safety measures are more effective than others. In fact, there's one popular precaution that experts now say is not only unnecessary for containing COVID, but may actually spread the virus. According to the Centers for Disease Control (CDC), the once-ubiquitous practice of wearing disposable gloves while running errands is not only ineffective, but also potentially dangerous.

According to the health authority, wearing gloves in everyday public settings "will not necessarily protect you from getting COVID-19 and may still lead to the spread of germs." They posit that gloves are "not necessary in most situations," citing the examples of pushing a shopping cart at the grocery store or using an ATM at the bank.

David Cutler, MD, a family medicine physician at Providence Saint John's Health Center in Santa Monica, California, agrees with the CDC's recommendation, and notes that the practice of wearing gloves in non-medical settings has always been "unsupported by science."

"While the SARS-CoV-2 virus which causes COVID can live on surfaces for many hours and maybe days, the likelihood of acquiring infection from those surfaces is very low," Cutler explains. "Most cases of COVID are transmitted by airborne droplets. Avoiding those droplets by wearing masks and distancing has proven to be very effective."

Experts also say that wearing gloves creates a false sense of security that can even increase your chances of accidentally contracting or transmitting COVID. "If you wear gloves in situations that do not have an obvious start and stopping point, you forget that your gloves are contaminated," Leann Poston, MD, medical expert for Ikon Health, previously told Best Life. "People put on gloves, go shopping, use their cell phones, touch their faces, enter their cars and homes, and then remove their gloves. Their hands were covered, but they cross-contaminated everything they touched. It is easier to forget about cross-contamination when wearing gloves. You are much more aware of what you touch when your hands are bare."

If you do choose to use disposable gloves for special circumstances, your handling of them is key. After use, be sure to remove them carefully and throw them away in a lined trash can. The CDC says you should never attempt to disinfect or reuse gloves, and you should wash your hands immediately and thoroughly after use.

Wondering when you should be wearing gloves for safety? Read on for the only exceptions to the rule, and for more on COVID precautions that aren't working, check out The CDC Warns Against Using These 6 Face Masks.

Read the original article on Best Life.

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