You are using an older browser version. Please use a supported version for the best MSN experience.

These Are Your Chances of Getting COVID If Someone in Your Home Has It

Best Life Logo By Paul Thompson of Best Life | Slide 1 of 5: While we already knew indoor gatherings are high-risk environments for spreading COVID, a new study conducted by the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC) shows just how easily you can catch COVID at home when you live with someone who is infected.To gain a better understanding of household transmission of the coronavirus, the CDC looked at 101 households in Nashville, Tennessee and Marshfield, Wisconsin from April to September. In each of the households there was one "index patient," who are defined as the first members of a household to show COVID symptoms, test positive for the illness, and live with at least one other household member. The 101 index members and 191 people that lived with them were trained to "complete symptom diaries and obtain self-collected specimens, nasal swabs only or nasal swabs and saliva samples, daily for 14 days," the CDC says.Read on to see how frequently the virus was passed inside the homes of infected patients and other key findings from the study, and for more on curbing the spread, check out This One Thing Is Better at Protecting You From COVID Than Your Mask.Read the original article on Best Life.

These Are Your Chances of Getting COVID If Someone in Your Home Has It

While we already knew indoor gatherings are high-risk environments for spreading COVID, a new study conducted by the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC) shows just how easily you can catch COVID at home when you live with someone who is infected.

To gain a better understanding of household transmission of the coronavirus, the CDC looked at 101 households in Nashville, Tennessee and Marshfield, Wisconsin from April to September. In each of the households there was one "index patient," who are defined as the first members of a household to show COVID symptoms, test positive for the illness, and live with at least one other household member. The 101 index members and 191 people that lived with them were trained to "complete symptom diaries and obtain self-collected specimens, nasal swabs only or nasal swabs and saliva samples, daily for 14 days," the CDC says.

Read on to see how frequently the virus was passed inside the homes of infected patients and other key findings from the study, and for more on curbing the spread, check out This One Thing Is Better at Protecting You From COVID Than Your Mask.

Read the original article on Best Life.

© Provided by Best Life

More from Best Life

image beaconimage beaconimage beacon