You are using an older browser version. Please use a supported version for the best MSN experience.

This Is How You're Making Your Depression Worse

Best Life Logo By Paul Thompson of Best Life | Slide 1 of 5: Nearly one in five adults in the United States lives with some kind of mental illness, according to the National Institute of Mental Health—that's about 50 million people. And due to COVID-19, the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC) says there are more people than ever dealing with some form of the condition. In a report issued in June 2020, the CDC analyzed survey responses and other data, concluding that people in the U.S. were experiencing "elevated levels" of mental health conditions like depression, anxiety, and substance issues in June 2020, compared with similar periods of time prior to the pandemic.The good news is that when it comes to depression, whether you have been diagnosed with the condition in its clinical form or are just feeling especially low due to what's going on in the world, there are things that you can do—or in this case stop doing—to make the experience a little bit more manageable. Here are a few of the ways you're making your depression worse. And to help you feel a little less alone when it comes to your mental health, check out Celebrities That Have Spoken About Their Depression.Read the original article on Best Life.

This Is How You're Making Your Depression Worse

Nearly one in five adults in the United States lives with some kind of mental illness, according to the National Institute of Mental Health—that's about 50 million people. And due to COVID-19, the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC) says there are more people than ever dealing with some form of the condition. In a report issued in June 2020, the CDC analyzed survey responses and other data, concluding that people in the U.S. were experiencing "elevated levels" of mental health conditions like depression, anxiety, and substance issues in June 2020, compared with similar periods of time prior to the pandemic.

The good news is that when it comes to depression, whether you have been diagnosed with the condition in its clinical form or are just feeling especially low due to what's going on in the world, there are things that you can do—or in this case stop doing—to make the experience a little bit more manageable. Here are a few of the ways you're making your depression worse. And to help you feel a little less alone when it comes to your mental health, check out Celebrities That Have Spoken About Their Depression.

Read the original article on Best Life.

© Provided by Best Life

More From Best Life

image beaconimage beaconimage beacon