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Watch For This Early Sign of Dementia, Says Report

ETNT Health Logo By Alek Korab of ETNT Health | Slide 1 of 6: Imagine spending $20,000 on a minivan and, the next morning, having no memory of making such a purchase. It wasn't fraud. It wasn't a computer error. You definitely bought the minivan. You just don't remember doing so. That was the jarring experience of Maria Turner, as reported by the New York Times. "I made a joke out of it, but it really disturbed me," she told the paper. More packages soon started arriving. She didn't know why. Years later, she got the diagnosis: cognitive decline, with her brain showing "hallmarks of chronic traumatic encephalopathy, a degenerative brain disease" and "evidence of Alzheimer's disease and frontotemporal dementia, which affects the frontal and temporal lobes of the brain.""It's not uncommon at all for us to hear that one of the first signs that families become aware of is around a person's financial dealings," Beth Kallmyer, vice president for care and support at the Alzheimer's Association, tells the paper. Yes, an early sign of dementia can be financial expenditures you have no memory making. The article was substantiated in an earlier study from two years back: "Previous studies show that people in the very early stages of Alzheimer's lose financial capacity; that is, their ability to manage their checkbook, to pay bills on time, to spend in ways that are consistent with the values they had in the past," explained the study's lead author, health economist Carole Roan Gresenz, Ph.D., interim dean for Georgetown University's School of Nursing & Health Studies. "What we found was that households in which someone is in the early stage of the disease are vulnerable to large reductions in liquid assets such as savings, money market, and checking accounts," she says.Read on for some other early signs of dementia, and to ensure your health and the health of others, don't miss these Sure Signs You Have "Long" COVID and May Not Even Know It.

Watch For This Early Sign of Dementia, Says Report

Imagine spending $20,000 on a minivan and, the next morning, having no memory of making such a purchase. It wasn't fraud. It wasn't a computer error. You definitely bought the minivan. You just don't remember doing so. 

That was the jarring experience of Maria Turner, as reported by the New York Times. "I made a joke out of it, but it really disturbed me," she told the paper. More packages soon started arriving. She didn't know why. Years later, she got the diagnosis: cognitive decline, with her brain showing "hallmarks of chronic traumatic encephalopathy, a degenerative brain disease" and "evidence of Alzheimer's disease and frontotemporal dementia, which affects the frontal and temporal lobes of the brain."

"It's not uncommon at all for us to hear that one of the first signs that families become aware of is around a person's financial dealings," Beth Kallmyer, vice president for care and support at the Alzheimer's Association, tells the paper. Yes, an early sign of dementia can be financial expenditures you have no memory making. 

The article was substantiated in an earlier study from two years back: "Previous studies show that people in the very early stages of Alzheimer's lose financial capacity; that is, their ability to manage their checkbook, to pay bills on time, to spend in ways that are consistent with the values they had in the past," explained the study's lead author, health economist Carole Roan Gresenz, Ph.D., interim dean for Georgetown University's School of Nursing & Health Studies. "What we found was that households in which someone is in the early stage of the disease are vulnerable to large reductions in liquid assets such as savings, money market, and checking accounts," she says.

Read on for some other early signs of dementia, and to ensure your health and the health of others, don't miss these Sure Signs You Have "Long" COVID and May Not Even Know It.

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