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Why You Shouldn't Skip Brushing Your Teeth (Even If You're Feeling Lazy)

Refinery29 Logo By Melissa Kravitz of Refinery29 | Slide 1 of 9: When you brush your teeth, you're removing bacteria that colonizes in your mouth after you eat, says <a href="http://www.jonathanblevine.com/">Jonathan Levine</a>, DMD. Plus, you're also brushing away any leftover pieces of food that can cause gum irritation. <br><br>"The longer you allow bacteria to colonize and collect, the more you nurture the progression of disease," Dr. Levine says. "Brushing well and often will keep the bacterial balance in the mouth healthy and not swing to the bad bacteria that causes decay and gum disease."<br><br>The human mouth is home to billions of bacteria — some good, some bad, and some benign — so removing excess harmful bacteria via daily brushing is a good idea if you want to avoid tooth decay and oral diseases like periodontitis.

Daily brushing gets harmful bacteria out of your mouth.

When you brush your teeth, you're removing bacteria that colonizes in your mouth after you eat, says Jonathan Levine, DMD. Plus, you're also brushing away any leftover pieces of food that can cause gum irritation.

"The longer you allow bacteria to colonize and collect, the more you nurture the progression of disease," Dr. Levine says. "Brushing well and often will keep the bacterial balance in the mouth healthy and not swing to the bad bacteria that causes decay and gum disease."

The human mouth is home to billions of bacteria — some good, some bad, and some benign — so removing excess harmful bacteria via daily brushing is a good idea if you want to avoid tooth decay and oral diseases like periodontitis.
© Photo: Getty Images.

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