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12 Foods That May Help You Breathe Better

Reader's Digest Logo By Ashley Lewis of Reader's Digest | Slide 1 of 12: <p>If you hear your kids wheezing, give them a glass of apple juice. A <a href='https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/17301090'>British study</a> found that children who drank apple juice once a day cut their likelihood of developing a wheezing problem in half compared to kids who drank it less often. Another study found that women who ate apples regularly during their pregnancy were less likely to have children who suffer from asthma or wheezing. Apples are packed with phenolic acids and flavonoids that are known for reducing inflammation in the air passageways, a common feature of both asthma and wheezing. (Here are more of the <a href='https://www.rd.com/health/healthy-eating/asthma-diet/1/'>best and worst foods for asthma</a>.) 'Asthma has increased in prevalence,' says Alan Mensch, MD, senior vice president of medical affairs at Plainview and Syosset hospitals in Long Island, New York. 'Some people speculate it’s because our diets have gone from a healthy diet to a less healthy diet over the past couple of decades.' Don't miss these other <a href='https://www.rd.com/health/conditions/damage-lungs/1/'>everyday items that can cause lung problems</a>.</p>

Apples

Need a breath of fresh air? Chow down on these foods for a great pair of lungs and a full body health boost.

If you hear your kids wheezing, give them a glass of apple juice. A British study found that children who drank apple juice once a day cut their likelihood of developing a wheezing problem in half compared to kids who drank it less often. Another study found that women who ate apples regularly during their pregnancy were less likely to have children who suffer from asthma or wheezing. Apples are packed with phenolic acids and flavonoids that are known for reducing inflammation in the air passageways, a common feature of both asthma and wheezing. (Here are more of the best and worst foods for asthma.) 'Asthma has increased in prevalence,' says Alan Mensch, MD, senior vice president of medical affairs at Plainview and Syosset hospitals in Long Island, New York. 'Some people speculate it’s because our diets have gone from a healthy diet to a less healthy diet over the past couple of decades.' 

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