You are using an older browser version. Please use a supported version for the best MSN experience.

30 Sugariest Foods In America

Eat This, Not That! Logo By © Provided by Eat This, Not That! of Eat This, Not That! | Slide 1 of 31: <p>By Riley Cardoza</p><p>From pasta sauce to whole wheat bread, there's a silent killer lurking in your favorite foods.</p><p>"I'm on a no sugar diet," said our friend Charlotte the other day. She was proudly eating a Healthy Choice frozen meal and drinking VitaminWater. "No desserts for a week."</p><p>Poor Charlotte. Little did she know, she was having dessert—for lunch. Added sugars were hiding right in her "healthy" meal.</p><p>"Americans' over-consumption of sweeteners has been linked to an array of health issues, including an increased risk of obesity, diabetes, heart disease, and stroke," says David Zinczenko, author of the bestselling book <a href="http://amzn.to/2rmhRYd">Zero Sugar Diet</a>. "And you'll find them in the foods you'd least expect."</p><p>As a result, the USDA issued guidelines for the first time last year, recommending Americans keep their consumption of added sugars to no more than 10 percent of overall calories, for an average of 47 grams or 12 teaspoons a day. Americans are unknowingly consuming an average of over triple that recommendation. So what can you—Charlotte—do to cut back? Start by avoiding these 30 Sugariest Foods in America, compliments of <a href="http://amzn.to/2rmhRYd">Zero Sugar Diet</a>.</p>

30 Sugariest Foods In America

By Riley Cardoza

From pasta sauce to whole wheat bread, there's a silent killer lurking in your favorite foods.

"I'm on a no sugar diet," said our friend Charlotte the other day. She was proudly eating a Healthy Choice frozen meal and drinking VitaminWater. "No desserts for a week."

Poor Charlotte. Little did she know, she was having dessert—for lunch. Added sugars were hiding right in her "healthy" meal.

"Americans' over-consumption of sweeteners has been linked to an array of health issues, including an increased risk of obesity, diabetes, heart disease, and stroke," says David Zinczenko, author of the bestselling book Zero Sugar Diet. "And you'll find them in the foods you'd least expect."

As a result, the USDA issued guidelines for the first time last year, recommending Americans keep their consumption of added sugars to no more than 10 percent of overall calories, for an average of 47 grams or 12 teaspoons a day. Americans are unknowingly consuming an average of over triple that recommendation. So what can you—Charlotte—do to cut back? Start by avoiding these 30 Sugariest Foods in America, compliments of Zero Sugar Diet.

© Provided by Eat This, Not That!

More from Eat This, Not That!

image beaconimage beaconimage beacon