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7 'Japanese' Foods No One Eats in Japan

By Megan duBois of Eat This, Not That! | Slide 1 of 7: When you think of Japanese food, what do you normally think of? Maybe sushi and a clear broth soup, or how about sitting at a large table with people you don't know with a chef that cooks your meal in front of you? Like many other foods from around the world, America has changed and tweaked dishes that are traditionally Japanese to make them fit the American palate and lifestyle."Most often a set meal that combines white rice, miso soup, and main ingredients uniquely called side dishes are eaten daily," says Chef Akinobu Matsuo, Director of Culinary, Marugame Udon. The result of playing with food? Pseudo-Japanese cuisine that's not actually eaten in Japan. In fact, sushi isn't eaten in Japan every day. "It's a misconception that Japanese people eat sushi every day. Japanese people eat sushi for celebrations or as a special event," says Manabu "Hori" Horiuchi, executive chef at Kata Robata in Houston.Here are some of the Americanized Japanese foods that no one actually eats, according to Japanese chefs and experts. (Also, check out 7 'Mexican' Dishes No One Eats in Mexico.)

7 'Japanese' Foods No One Eats in Japan

When you think of Japanese food, what do you normally think of? Maybe sushi and a clear broth soup, or how about sitting at a large table with people you don't know with a chef that cooks your meal in front of you? Like many other foods from around the world, America has changed and tweaked dishes that are traditionally Japanese to make them fit the American palate and lifestyle.

"Most often a set meal that combines white rice, miso soup, and main ingredients uniquely called side dishes are eaten daily," says Chef Akinobu Matsuo, Director of Culinary, Marugame Udon. The result of playing with food? Pseudo-Japanese cuisine that's not actually eaten in Japan. In fact, sushi isn't eaten in Japan every day. "It's a misconception that Japanese people eat sushi every day. Japanese people eat sushi for celebrations or as a special event," says Manabu "Hori" Horiuchi, executive chef at Kata Robata in Houston.

Here are some of the Americanized Japanese foods that no one actually eats, according to Japanese chefs and experts. (Also, check out 7 'Mexican' Dishes No One Eats in Mexico.)

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