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Celery Juice Sounds Gross, But Here's Why Everyone is Drinking it

Men's Health logo Men's Health 1/10/2019 Melissa Matthews
a bowl of food with broccoli: Drinking celery juice is the hot new trend that promises to help with everything from weight loss to inflammation. But are these health benefits legit? We asked the experts. © Johner Images - Getty Images Drinking celery juice is the hot new trend that promises to help with everything from weight loss to inflammation. But are these health benefits legit? We asked the experts.

If you're still drinking kale juice, we're here to tell you that's so 2018. Celery juice is the latest health trend that's taken over social media, seemingly overnight.

Sure, celery tastes great when you slather some PB on top, but drinking an entire glass of the juiced vegetable seems less appealing. So what gives? Well, celery is the latest cure-all, according to wannabe health gurus on Instagram and YouTube. People claim celery juice offers a wide-range of benefits, from lowering inflammation, to helping with weight loss, preventing ulcers, and even clearing up acne.

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But before you buy up all the celery at your local market, here's what you should know about the alleged health benefits of celery juice before running to make yourself a glass.

Where did the celery juice trend start?

It may seem like celery juice just popped up out of nowhere to dethrone kale as the ultimate king of green, but The Atlantic traced its origins back to "Medical Medium" Anthony William. On his personal website, where he includes endorsements from celebrities like Gwyneth Paltrow and Robert DeNiro, William claims to have diagnosed his grandmother with lung cancer when he was four years old. Since then, he's "read" people's conditions and offered treatment advice despite not having any formal medical education.

More than a million people follow William on Instagram, where, in his bio, he claims to help "people overcome illness" and is the "originator of global celery juice movement." Other Instagram users frequently share William's posts about the purported benefits of drinking celery juice, including conditions it may help treat. Open up Instagram and you'll find more than 63,000 posts dedicated to #celeryjuice.

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So, what are the actual health benefits of celery juice?

Let's just start off by saying that drinking celery juice is not proven to cure or treat any ailment.

“There is no one food that will cure your cancer, inflammatory disease, or other ailment, so don’t believe the hype you see and hear on Instagram,” Ashley Koff, R.D., explained to The Atlantic.

But that's not to say there aren't studies looking at the benefits of celery. A 2013 study showed that people with mild to moderately elevated blood pressure were able to lower the number by taking celery seed extract. Researchers believe this benefit is due to a chemical compound called butylphthalide, which some studies suggest may keep your brain healthy and reduce risk of stroke.

In 2014, a study conducted in gerbils found that a flavonoid in celery lowered inflammation and slowed the growth of cancerous tumors. But these studies are preliminary, and much more research needs to be done (in people!) before doctors will recommend eating celery for brain or heart health.

However, that doesn't mean that celery, and celery juice, isn't still a great, healthy snack.

Celery is full of fiber, magnesium, and potassium, which are important for regularity, bone and heart health. And since celery is low in calories, it can be especially good for those trying to lose weight. But celery alone will not make you drop pounds fast.

And as Lisa Young, R.D. and nutrition professor at NYU, explained to The Atlantic, juicing your vegetables doesn't make them any more beneficial.

“You don’t have to drink it; you can also chew it,” she says. “Whatever happened to chewing?"

Video: Hoda isn’t so sure about Kathie Lee’s celery juice (TODAY)

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